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This Week’s Girliemag Article – Hunting For An Apartment

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A digital recreation of an article published in Eve Magazine Vol1 No1 from 1962

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Lovely Barbara Martin is the first of a new crop of starlets to start earning some part time cash renting apartments in the many new housing developments in and around Los Angeles. We called Barbara for a modeling assignment, but she quickly told us she had a part time job and couldn’t leave the apartment.

Read the whole article and see
the naughty pictures HERE


Warning: Nudity do occur in this article. If you are under age or live in a country where watching images of nude women for some reason is against the law  I take no responsibility if you click the link above. In other words you’re flying solo from here on – Ted ;-)


Filed under: Article, Glamour, Models & starlets, Nudes, Pinups, The sixties Tagged: 1962, Barbara Martin, Eve Magazine, Girliemags, Glamour models

Riley One-Point-Five / Wolseley 1500

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The Riley One-Point-Five and similar Wolseley 1500 were motor vehicles based on the Morris Minor floorpan, suspension and steering but fitted with the larger 1489 cc B-Series engine and MG Magnette gearbox. Launched in 1957, the twins were differentiated by nearly 20 hp (15 kW), the Riley having twin SU carburettors giving it the most power at 68 hp (50 kW). The Wolseley was released in April of that year, while the Riley appeared in November, directly after the 1957 London Motor Show.

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The Series II model came out in May 1960. The most notable external difference was the hidden boot and bonnet hinges. Interior storage was improved with the fitting of a full width parcel shelf directly beneath the fascia.

The Series III launched in October 1961, featuring revisions to the grille and rear lights.

In October 1962 the car received the more robust crank, bearing and other details of the larger 1,622 cc unit now being fitted in the Austin Cambridge and its "Farina" styled clones. Unlike the Farina models, however, the Wolseley 1500 and Riley one-point-five retained the 1,489 cc engine size with which they had been launched back in 1957.

Production ended in 1965 with 39,568 Rileys and 103,394 Wolseleys made.

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Differences

The One-Point-Five and its 1500 sibling had a number of differences, with the Wolseley generally being the less well-equipped model:

  • 887_wolsley_08Engine – The Riley benefited from dual SU H4 carburettors while the Wolseley received only one.
  • Exterior – The front panel and grille looks similar on both cars, but is different. The stainless trim along the side of the cars is different, as well, as are the headlamp surrounds.
  • Dashboard – Both cars received wooden dashboards. While the Riley had a full complement of gauges (speedometer, tachometer, and temp/oil/fuel) placed directly in front of the driver, the Wolseley made do with only the speedometer and temp/oil/fuel gauges, which were placed in the centre of the dashboard.
  • Brakes – The Riley was equipped with a larger Girling braking system, while the Wolseley received a smaller Lockheed system. The Girling brakes on the Riley One-Point-Five were often sought out by Morris Minor owners looking a way to upgrade their brakes.

Performance

In its day the Riley was successfully raced and rallied and can still be seen today in historical sporting events.

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A Wolseley 1500 was tested by the British magazine The Motor in 1957. It was found to have a top speed of 76.7 mph (123.4 km/h) and could accelerate from 0-60 mph (97 km/h) in 24.8 seconds. A fuel consumption of 36.6 miles per imperial gallon (7.7 L/100 km; 30.5 mpg-US) was recorded. The test car cost £758 including taxes of £253.


Filed under: Article, Automobiles, British, The fifties, The sixties Tagged: British cars, mini cars, Riley One-Point-Five, Wolseley 1500

On This Day In 1969: Man Takes First Steps On The Moon

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American Neil Armstrong has become the first man to walk on the Moon. The astronaut stepped onto the Moon’s surface, in the Sea of Tranquility, at 0256 GMT, nearly 20 minutes after first opening the hatch on the Eagle landing craft.

APOLLO 11Armstrong had earlier reported the lunar module’s safe landing at 2017 GMT with the words: "Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed." As he put his left foot down first Armstrong declared: "That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." He described the surface as being like powdered charcoal and the landing craft left a crater about a foot deep.

We came in peace

The historic moments were captured on television cameras installed on the Eagle and turned on by Armstrong.Armstrong spent his first few minutes on the Moon taking photographs and soil samples in case the mission had to be aborted suddenly.

He was joined by colleague Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin at 0315 GMT and the two collected data and performed various exercises – including jumping across the landscape – before planting the Stars and Stripes flag at 0341 GMT.

888_wotm3They also unveiled a plaque bearing President Nixon’s signature and an inscription reading: "Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon July 1969 AD. We came in peace for all mankind."

After filming their experience with a portable television camera the astronauts received a message from the US President. President Nixon, in the White House, spoke of the pride of the American people and said: "This certainly has to be the most historic telephone call ever made." Many other nations – including the UK – sent messages of congratulation.

Moscow Radio announced the news solemnly in its 1030 GMT broadcast.

As Aldrin and Armstrong collected samples, Michael Collins told mission control in Houston he had successfully orbited the Moon in the mother ship Columbia, and take-off was on schedule for 1750 GMT this evening.

In Context

Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin spent a total of 21 hours on the Moon, two-and-a-half of them outside the landing module.

After re-joining the Columbia mothership the astronauts – including Collins – left the Moon’s orbit on 22 July and returned to Earth on 24 July.The three men spent the next 21 days in quarantine at an American military base – a procedure dropped in subsequent missions since no alien organisms were found.

The Moon landing marked the pinnacle of the space race and American investment in the space programme declined accordingly. A further 10 astronauts travelled to the Moon in another six missions with the final manned lunar landing, Apollo 17, completed in December 1972.

Text from BBC’s OnThisDay

I was 16 years old back then and I remember it quite clearly. It was in the middle of the school holiday and I had a slight cold. I was at our cottage outside of Oslo with my parents and the TV broadcast reached our little corner of the world too. I kept on dozing off because of the cold and my parents promised to wake me up when the landing drew near and they did. The next hour was magic, simply magic – Ted


Filed under: Article, People, Retro technology, The sixties Tagged: 1969, Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, Michael Collins, Moon landing, Neil Armstrong

Round The World By Steam – Hamburg-Amerika Linie

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The Hamburg Amerikanische Paketfahrt Aktien-Gesellschaft (HAPAG for short, often referred to in English as Hamburg America Line (sometimes also 1903_Hamburg-Amerika Linie_01Hamburg-American Line, Hamburg-Amerika Linie or Hamburg Line); literally Hamburg American Packet-shipping Joint-stock company) was a transatlantic shipping enterprise established inHamburg, Germany, in 1847. Among the founders were prominent citizens such as Albert Ballin (Director General), Adolph Godeffroy, Ferdinand Laeisz, Carl Woermann, August Bolten and others, and its main financial backers wereBerenberg Bank and H. J. Merck & Co. It soon developed into the largest German, and at times the world’s largest, shipping company, serving the market created by the German immigration to the United States and later immigration from Eastern Europe. On September 1, 1970, after 123 years of independent existence, HAPAG merged with the Bremen-based North German Lloyd to form Hapag-Lloyd AG.

In the early years, the Hamburg America Line exclusively connected European ports with North American ports, such asHoboken, New Jersey, or New Orleans, Louisiana. With time, however, the company established lines to all continents.

Notable journeys

In 1858, its liner Austria sank, killing 449 people. In 1891, the cruise of the Augusta Victoria in the Mediterranean and the Near East from 22 January to 22 1903_Hamburg-Amerika Linie_05March, with 241 passengers including Albert Ballin and wife, is often stated to have been the first passenger cruise. Christian Wilhelm Allers published an illustrated account of it as "Bakschisch". In 1900, 1901 and 1903 its liner Deutschland won the Blue Riband taking the prize from the Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse. In 1906 Prinzessin Victoria Luiseran aground off the coast of Jamaica. No lives were lost by the grounding; however, the ship’s captain committed suicide after getting all the passengers safely off the ship. In 1912, its liner SS Amerika was the first ship to warn Titanic of icebergs.

HAPAG’s leader Albert Ballin, believed that safety, size, comfort and luxury would always win out over speed. Thus he conceived the three largest liners yet to be built, named the Imperator, Vaterland and Bismarck. The first two were briefly in 1903_Hamburg-Amerika Linie_07service before the First World War. In 1914, the Vaterland was caught in port at Hoboken, New Jersey at the outbreak of World War I and interned by the United States. She was seized, renamed Leviathanafter the declaration of war on Germany in 1917, and served for the duration and beyond as a troopship. After the war, she was retained by the Americans for war reparations. In 1919 Vaterland’s sister ships —Imperator and the unfinished Bismarck—were handed over to the allies as war reparations to Britain and sold toCunard Line and White Star Line, respectively, and renamed Berengaria and Majestic. In 1917, its liner Allemannia 1903_Hamburg-Amerika Linie_04was "torpedoed by German submarine near Alicante"; 2 people were lost In 1939, its liner St. Louis was unable to find a port in Cuba, the United States, or Canada willing to accept the more than 950 Jewish refugees on board and had to return to Europe.

Later years

Hamburg America Line lost almost the entirety of its fleet twice, as a result of World War I and World War II. In 1970, the company merged with longtime rivalNorddeutscher Lloyd (North German Lloyd) of Bremen to establish the current-day Hapag-Lloyd.

Text from Wikipedia 

No information on the ship on the poster was available on the net – Ted


Filed under: Article, Holidays, Maritime history, Posters, Transportation, Traveling Tagged: German steam ship lines, Hamburg-Amerika Linie, Steam ship lines

1951 Hoffmann

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In the period immediately after the Second World War, many talented people wanted to "have a go" at producing their own vehicle. One such was a certain M. Hoffmann from Munich who, from 1949 to 1951 came up with this extraordinary vehicle.

Its enormous width derives from its most interesting mechanical feature: its rear-wheel steering. A large triangular frame structure supporting the entire motor (ex Goliath Pionier) is pivoted at its forward end on a massive kingpin. A complex system of levers provides the steering, which moves the entire cradle from side to side in a wide arc.

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The result is a lethal cocktail of automotive engineering "don’t’s"- extreme front track width combined with an ultra-short wheelbase giving major straight line instability, and rear-wheel steering which can easily bring loss of control at any except very slow speeds, to which any fork-truck driver can attest.

The central position of the steering kingpin in the car means there is little room for the driver and passenger up front, and the original bench seat has been substituted for two smaller separate ones, allowing slightly better access to the cramped cabin over the wide sills.

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Perhaps this interesting and eccentric vehicle can be used to illustrate the reason why in this modern day one has a myriad of rules to contend with when building a vehicle.

Images and text from microcarmuseum.com


Filed under: Article, Automobiles, Transportation, Traveling Tagged: 1951, 1951 Hoffmann, German cars, Micro cars, mini cars

James Garner, 1928–2014

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There are actors who become stars because they strike awe — because they’re imposing, powerful, monumental. And then there was James Garner.

Garner, who died Saturday night of natural causes at age 86, was no toothpick of a man — he was a former high school football and basketball player who kept his rugged, weathered good looks long into life. But the characters he became famous for, especially TV’s Bret Maverick and Jim Rockford, won you over with their minds. They got through trouble with cleverness, charm and subtle wit. Garner wasn’t the kind of star who won love because he seemed so elevated above you: he made you love him by showing you that he was on your level — had in fact 1952_garner_02spent some time down in the dirt, brushed off the dust, and moved on with a rascally smile.

The handsome Garner was a natural for westerns and war pictures and adventure movies. But the characters that proved the best fit for his natural, easygoing charm were anything but typical screen stars. He came of age as an actor in the heyday of the TV western, not by playing an upstanding lawman but as the wily, disarming card shark Bret Maverick in the action-comedy Maverick, a gambler and ladies’ man who had the fastest mind in the West.

Garner’s most famous role, as Jim Rockford in The Rockford Files in 1974, was the perfect meeting of Garner’s talents and the spirit of the age. Like Bret Maverick, Rockford was a screen-hero archetype who became all the bigger for being cut down to size: a private detective who’d spent time in jail on a bad rap, always one step ahead of the bill collectors and one good night’s sleep shy of his peak. He was not a pressed suit; he was a rumpled jacket that could use a dry cleaning. And that was what made him wear so comfortably.

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In the end, charm and humor wear more comfortably than rage and drama. Audiences love that kind of character. Fate loves that kind of character. If you need a quick thumbnail philosophy for living, it would not be a terrible one to simply remember to ask yourself, whenever you face adversity, “What would Jim Rockford do?” For posing that question, and giving it such an entertaining answer, thank you James Garner, and RIP.

Text from TIME


Filed under: Actors, Article, Movies, Television Tagged: American actors, James Garner

This Week’s Softdrink – Bevo

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Bevo was a non-alcoholic malt beverage, or near beer, brewed in the United States by the Anheuser-Busch company beginning in the early 20th century. Bevo enjoyed its greatest success during the time of prohibition, when beer, 890_bevo_03wine and distilled liquors, were made illegal for thirteen years.

The Anheuser-Busch company started brewing Bevo when alcoholic beverages were prohibited in 1916 by the United States armed forces. Production rose greatly with national prohibition in 1919, and Bevo was by far the most popular of the many "cereal beverages" or "near beers" of the time. At 890_bevo_02the peak of its popularity in the early 1920s, more than five million cases of Bevo were sold annually.

Labels on the bottles billed it as "Bevo the Beverage". The name "Bevo" was coined from the word "beverage" and the Slavic language word for beer "pivo", and was pronounced "Bee-vo".

Some Bevo advertising featured the character "Renard the Fox" (based on the protagonist of a medieval French folk-tale), and promotional mugs with this character were manufactured. In 1930 Anheuser-Busch built a series of boat-bodied cars in its St. Louis shops called the "Bevo Boats" which were used for promotion. Seven are believed to have been built on Pierce-Arrow 8-cylinder chassis while one surviving example was based upon 1930 Cadillac 353 V8.

890_bevo_04A contemporary advertisement read "Cooling and invigorating, Bevo the Beverage. Order by the case from your grocer, druggist, or dealer." The paper label on the back of the bottle read "The All-Year-Round Soft Drink. Appetizing – Healthful – Nutritious – Refreshing. Milk or water may contain bacteria. BEVO never does."

Bevo became part of the popular culture of the time, and is mentioned in various popular songs and Vaudeville skits of the era. This led to secondary slang uses of the word; for example, in American military slang a young and inexperienced officer was called a "Bevo". The University of Texas named its mascot "Bevo", a name which has stuck to this day.

890_bevo_05Irving Berlin included a paean to the drink, "You Can’t Stay Up on Bevo", in his 1917 army revue, Yip Yip Yaphank. As the Prohibition Era was starting, "On the Streets of Cairo" by Jesse G. M. Gluck & Geo. P. Hulten assured people that in Cairo "you won’t have to drink pale Bevo, Booze there has a kick.

In the late 1920s smuggled bootleg beer and liquor as well as "homebrew", cut into Bevo’s marketshare. With sales flattening to 100,000 cases by 1929, Anheuser-Busch stopped production.

890_bevo_05The Bevo building, with the Renard character prominently displayed at the corners, still operates as a bottling facility at their main brewery in St. Louis, Missouri. The landmark Bevo Mill, constructed by August Anheuser Busch, Sr. in 1917. It was closed in 2009, but it reopened in October 2009 under new owners.

Bevo is also mentioned in the short story "The Killers" by Ernest Hemingway; as well as in Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis.

Decades later, Bevo was mentioned in the song "Trouble" in the musical The Music Man as a reference to an objectionable aspect of the culture of young people during the time in which the musical was set (although The Music Man was set in 1912, four years prior to Bevo’s introduction).

Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Help Needed
I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

List of Soft drinks and sodas posted already
Visitors soft drinks and sodas suggestions and comments


Filed under: Article, Food & drinks, Soft drinks and sodas Tagged: Bevo, The Anheuser-Busch company, The soft drink project

Great American Cars Of The Forties – 1942-1945 Willys Army Jeep

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Is any vehicle better known than the military Jeep? Not likely, unless it’s the Ford Model T or Volkswagen Beetle. Not surprisingly, they’re similar in several ways. All were known for rugged construction, no-frills simplicity, and all-purpose dependability. And in the minds of their owners-or uniformed driversall had near-human personalities. These were more than just vehicles: they were friends.

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The Jeep served beyond the call of duty during World War II on eastern and western front alike. Whether at Anzio or along the Burma Road, from South Pacific jungles to the shifting sands of North Africa, the Jeep was sure to be there, doing whatever was required-and more. It was conceived mainly for reconnaissance, but its service record was far more varied. Jeeps carried troops, both well and wounded, mounted guns, hauled supplies, guarded lines, delivered messages, and transported everyone from commanding generals and VIPs to rank-and-file GIs. Even President Roosevelt used one when reviewing the troops. Army chief of staff General George Marshall called it "America’s greatest contribution to modern warfare." Few who knew it disagreed.

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Credit for the Jeep concept goes to American Bantam, the pioneering compact-car maker of 1936-41, which also developed the initial prototype and participated in wartime production. But the name is forever tied to Willys-Overland, which submitted a competing proposal and turned out the military version in huge numbers in 1941-45. Willys made only the chassis, however. Bodies came from outside suppliers. ‘

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Willys’ first Jeep was the "Quad" prototype, delivered to Camp Holabird, Maryland, on Novevember 11, 1940. Finalized under company engineering vice-president Delmar G. "Barney" Roos, it was, per Army specifications, a lightweight, quarterton utility vehicle with four-wheel drive, and had a curved, snout-like front. After extensive testing, the basic design was accepted, and fullscale development began at the Willys plant in Toledo. The "Quad" was followed by a second prototype in 1941, the MA, created to counter alternatives from Bantam and Ford. Wearing a flat, vertical-bar grille and headlamps perched atop the front fenders, it rode an 80-inch wheelbase and measured 130 inches long. Power was supplied by the 134.2-cubic-inch L-head four from the 1941-42 Americar passenger models, churning out 63 horsepower. Willys built exactly 1577 of the MAs. Some time later, it turned to the eventual military version, designated MB. It was identical with the MA except for being two inches longer, weighing 2450 pounds, and having a fold-down windshield and headlights built into the front grille area. There were no doors, of course. By war’s end, Willys had turned out . 359,489 of them. Ford built another 227,000 under license.

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The Jeep’s reputation as mainly a Willys creation is owed to company president Joseph Frazer. Though he had little to do with its design, he had plenty to do with its publicity, and helped the public forget that Ford was making them too. He even claimed to have coined the name-from G.P., "general purpose," the Army’s original description-though some insist it was borrowed from the "Popeye" cartoon character.

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In all, wartime Jeep production was over 585,000 units. Military production would continue after the war, of course, but Willys wasted no time putting the concept in "civvies." First came a modified version dubbed CJ, for "civilian Jeep," followed in 1946 by an all-steel station wagon loosely based on the original design.

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The military Jeeps were tough, versatile, and highly adaptable. But most of all they were loved. Bill Mauldin’s famous 1944 cartoon said it best, without words. Agrizzled, sadfaced sergeant, eyes covered with one hand, is aiming a pistol at his Jeep to put it out of its misery. Every military man and woman understood. But some may have wondered whether any Jeep was ever beyond repair. Surely it could be mended just one more time.


Filed under: Article, Automobiles, The forties, Transportation, WW II Tagged: 1942-1954, American army vehicles, Willys Army Jeep

Ted Is Heading For The Coast

Holiday Report – Part 1

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Here’s the family summer cottage where I usually spend at least parts of my summer holiday. And here’s the view from the terrace – New report will follow tomorrow –Ted

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Filed under: Holidays, Information Tagged: Summer holiday

Holiday Report – Part 2

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The Outhouse

This one is for Carolyn, so she doesn’t have to be a good girl for too long ;-)

This is an outhouse I build about 5 years ago, the old one had been there since 1954 and was literarily falling apart so a new one was deeply needed, besides the old one was narrow and not very nice to have to visit. Unfortunately my sister had started to paint the lower panelling grey the week before I arrived but hadn’t gotten very far.

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A Norwegian outhouse should have at least one picture of a member of the royal family, preferably a king. This is because people used old magazine, telephone catalogues and such before commercial toilet paper reached rural districts and when a picture of members of the royal family turned up in a magazine people felt it was  to disrespectful to wipe their bottoms with royalty. the picture page was then torn nicely out of the magazine and pinned to the wall.

We have gone one step further and framed our old pictures of the kings, king Olav V in the picture above and in the frame glimpsed in the picture above that, king Haakon VII as he steps onto Oslo harbour when arriving home after WWII.

We do actually have a ultra modern electric toilet as well so there are only the true traditionalists, my sister, her husband and me who use the outhouse.


Filed under: DIY project, Holidays, Illustration Tagged: Outhouses, Summer holidays

Holiday Report – Part 3

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The Well House

This is a well house  built the same summer I built the outhouse. There was an old pyramid shaped well house there that had been there for donkey’s years but it was beginning to be quite unsafe and as both my oldest daughter and my sisters oldest daughter started having kids it was time to build a new one.

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There’s a pipeline going from the well to the bathroom where there’s an electric pump that provides water for the washbasin and the shower. The inspection hatch is just for checking the water level.

The storage room under the back terrace is also my handiwork. Since I don’t like sunning and get restless without something to do it was decided to build a carpentry shop for me when the last expansion was done. So I have a nice 15 square metre shop full of tools where I can tinker with my projects.


Filed under: Holidays, Information Tagged: Summer holiday, Well houses, Wells

Holiday Report – Part 4

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The New Wind Gauge

Ever since our grandchildren had grown old enough to walk around the place we’ve had a wind gauge on a pole. This is the third generation. It was a rather hard winter here so the snow, ice and wind had torn most of generation two to pieces. So yesterday I had to build generation three. The only thing left from generation one is the propeller, the screw that holds the propeller and the pole.

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I like weather beaten wood so it is not treated with anything, still I reckon it’ll last 4 or 5 years and in that time turn a nice silvery grey like the propeller already is. It is not the most scientific of wind gauges, the rudder keep the plane turned towards the wind which tells us the direction and the noise from the propeller tells us about how hard the wind is. On the other hand, all four kids love it and can sit around on the grass watching it for ages– Ted ;-)


Filed under: Holidays, Information Tagged: propellers, Toy planes, Wind gauges

Holiday Report – Part 5

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Stairs for the deep water quay

On Wednesday my oldest niece arrived with her husband and two children in their 35 feet sailing boat and that posted a problem as there are no stairs up from the deep water quay and as you can see the rocks down there are steep and they get very slippery when wet. In other words not very suited for two small children.

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Apart from the handrail for the children my niece’s husband and I finished the stairs in two days and by the time they leave later this week he will have finished that too.

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Earlier to day my sister drove me to Porsgrunn where I caught the train for Oslo where I’m now sitting writing this post. I’ll be going down to the summer cottage later this summer too, on a couple of what we call an oval weekend around here (Thursday to Monday ;-) )


Filed under: Holidays, Information Tagged: Deep water quays, Stairs, Summer holidays

This Week’s Softdrink – Pennsylvania Dutch Birch Beer

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493_dutch_birch_beer_02Pennsylvania Dutch Birch Beer is a brand of soft drink, of the birch beer type, whose trademark is owned by USA Beverages, Inc., a beverage bottler operating primarily in the United States. It is available in regular and diet varieties, and is sold in 12 ounce cans, 20 ounce plastic bottles, and 2-litre bottles. Pennsylvania Dutch Birch Beer’s regular variety is sweetened with sugar and/or high-fructose corn syrup. Its diet variety has been sweetened with saccharin and/or aspartame as these have gained preferability, and some people have proposed using sucralose for the purpose.

493_dutch_birch_beer_01Some other bottlers offer their own versions of birch beer. In the earlier 1990’s Pennsylvania Dutch Birch Beer brand was bottled under authority of the PDBB Co. by A-Treat Beverages, Inc. (Allentown, PA) and Pepsi Cola Bottling (Williamsport, PA) and was distributed by D & M Management, Inc. (Davidsville, PA), an independent beverage distribution firm, in the West Central Pennsylvania, Maryland, Washington, DC, and the Northern Virginia areas.


Help Needed
I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

List of Soft drinks and sodas posted already
Visitors soft drinks and sodas suggestions and comments


Filed under: Food & drinks, Soft drinks and sodas Tagged: American sodas, American soft drinks, Pennsylvania Dutch Birch Beer

Great American Cars Of The Forties – 1946/48 Dodge Custom

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Dependability may be dull, but it does have rewards. Take Dodge, for instance. Since its founding in 1914, the make had prospered with sturdy, no-nonsense transportation, and becoming a division of Chrysler Corporation in 1928 did nothing to change that. Dependability remained almost synonymous with Dodge in the years right after World War II, and that’s precisely why we rank its early postwar models as great cars of the Forties. They’re significant as representatives of the product philosophy that had enabled Chrysler to overhaul Ford Motor Company as the nation’s second largest automaker in that worst of economic times, the Thirties.

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Chrysler had built its early high success primarily on engineering, and with few exceptions its cars had always been mechanically superb but aesthetically drab. There was a reason for this: beginning with Walter P. Chrysler himself, the company had always been run by engineers, who tended to be conservative in their approach to design, if not disinterested. Then too, the firm’s one attempt at progressive styling, the Chrysler and DeSoto Airflow of the mid-Thirties, had been a bust, and the experience made management even more reluctant to try anything even remotely radical. Reflecting this attitude was K.T. Keller, who took over as company president on Walter Chrysler’S death in 1940. Himself an engineer, Keller was not without a sense of style, but he cared far more about practical points like passenger room and driver visibility. Naturally, his engineer-stylists gave him what he wanted, with the result that, as one wag put it, Keller’s cars "wouldn’t knock your eyes out, but they wouldn’t knock your hat off, either."

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Once car production resumed in late 1945, Chrysler followed most of Detroit by hauling out its 1942 dies and issuing

mildly restyled continuations for 1946-48. Dodge, like its corporate siblings, retained its basic prewar styling, which had been laid down with the 1940 models by former company designer Raymond H. Dietrich, the famed Thirties coachbuilder. The Dodge facelift, based partly on wartime studies, was ‘ handled by A.B. "Buzz" Grisinger, John Chika, and Herb Weissinger. Allowed bolt-on modifications only, they did a remarkably effective job. The main change was a chromier, cross-hatch grille. Inside was a gaudier new dash that retained full engine instrumentation but departed from prewar practice in its asymmetrical layout.

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Mechanically, the first postwar Dodge was much like the last prewar model. Wheelbase remained at 119.5 inches, with a 137.5-inch chassis reserved for a low-volume seven-seat sedan. Power was still supplied by a 230.2-cubic-inch L-head six, which was inexplicably rated at 102 horsepower, 3 bhp less than before. Mechanical changes included moving the starter from a foot pedal to a button on the dash, twin-cylinder front brakes, standard inline fuel filter and full-flow oil filter. Fluid Drive returned as an option and became standard for 1947-48, an important sales plus. Dodge retained its then-customary two-tier model lineup, with base DeLuxe and fancier Custom trim levels spanning six body styles. Initially, prices ranged from $1229 for the DeLuxe business coupe to $1743 for the long-chassis Custom sedan. By the end of this series in early 1949, the spread had moved up to $1587-$2179.

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After a slow start, Dodge finished’ 1946 in fourth place behind Chevy, Ford, and Plymouth, contributing mightily to Chrysler’s fortunes in the booming seller’s market. Volume improved for 1947, but the make slipped to fifth. It then rebounded to fourth for 1948. Aside from a bit more detail in the traditional ram hood ornament for 1947-48, the basic design was absolutely unaltered until Chrysler’s first new postwar models arrived in early 1949.

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Time has a way of changing perspective, and the 1946-48 Dodge doesn’t seem nearly so dowdy now as it did when new. Maybe that’s because time also tends to develop character in both people and cars. This Dodge certainly has character. We should all age so well.


Filed under: Article, Automobiles, The forties Tagged: 1946 Dodge Custom, 1948 Dodge Custom, American cars

Vårt Brygg – Our Brew

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With the crazy patterns and colours, platform shoes and ridiculous long shirt collars came another terrible seventies idea; the light beer. This add is from 1975 when Landsøl disappeared and Brigg was introduced in Norway.

I was 22 back then and when I hit town with my buddies I couldn’t care less for low calories or low alcohol percentage, I simply wanted to get drunk no matter how tough the Brigg drinking blokes in the ad looked – Ted

And come on, all three guys looks like someone pissed in their beer. Usually people smile when they drink good beer ;-)

Image found at Sollie’s Krøniker


Filed under: Advertising, Advertisments, Food & drinks, Norwegian Tagged: Brigg, Lettøl, Light beer

Sometimes ….

Round Britain By Railway Posters – North East Dales

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yorkshire dales

The Yorkshire Dales (also known simply as The Dales) is an upland area of Northern England dissected by numerous valleys.

The area lies within the county boundaries of historic Yorkshire, though it spans the ceremonial counties of North Yorkshire and Cumbria. Most of the area falls within the Yorkshire Dales National Park, created in 1954 and now one of the fifteen National parks of Britain, but the term also includes areas to the east of the National Park, notably Nidderdale.

896_dales_03

The Dales is a collection of river valleys and the hills among them, rising from the Vale of York westwards to the hilltops of the main Pennine watershed. In some places the area extends westwards across the watershed, but most of the valleys drain eastwards to the Vale of York, into the Ouse and then the Humber.

896_dales_04The word dale comes from the Nordic/Germanic word for valley (dal, tal), and occurs in valley names across Yorkshire and Northern England. but the name Yorkshire Dales is generally used to refer specifically to the dales west of theVale of York and north of the West Yorkshire Urban Area.

Tourism

The majority of visitors are sightseers, with 75% visiting to drive around and 65% walking around. This indicates that most are there to take in the beauty of the surroundings. 26% also partake in hiking nature trails and spotting wildlife. 45% visit an information centre and 35% visit a castle or other historic site. 94% of visitors travel in a private mode of transport, with 90% using a car. The remaining 6% travel using public transport.

Yorkshire Dales National Park

In 1954 an area of 1,770 square kilometres (680 sq mi) was designated the Yorkshire Dales National Park. Most of theNational Park is in North Yorkshire, though part lies within Cumbria. The whole park lies within the historic 896_dales_01boundaries of Yorkshire, divided between the North Riding and the West Riding. The park is 50 miles (80 km) north-east of Manchester; Leeds and Bradford lie to the south, while Kendal is to the west, Darlington to the north-east and Harrogate to the south-east. A proposed westward extension of the park into Lancashire and Cumbria would encompass much of the area between the current park and the M6 motorway, coming close to the towns of Kirkby Lonsdale, Kirkby Stephen and Appleby-in-Westmorland. This proposal to add 162 square miles to the park has now been agreed by all interested parties and merely awaits ministerial approval. For the first time the Yorkshire Dales and Lake District national parks will be contiguous.

896_dales_05Over 20,000 residents live and work in the park, which attracts over eight million visitors every year. The area has a large collection of activities for visitors. For example, many people come to the Dales for walking or exercise. The National Park is crossed by several long-distance routes including the Pennine Way, the Dales Way, the Coast to Coast Walk and the latest national trail — the Pennine Bridleway. Cycling is also popular and there are several cycleways.

The Park has its own museum, the Dales Countryside Museum, housed in a conversion of the Hawes railway station in Wensleydale in the north of the area. The park has five visitor centres located in major destinations in the park.


Filed under: Article, British, Ephemera, Holidays, Illustration, Places, Transportation, Traveling

Round Britain By Railway Posters – North East Dales

0
0

yorkshire dales

The Yorkshire Dales (also known simply as The Dales) is an upland area of Northern England dissected by numerous valleys.

The area lies within the county boundaries of historic Yorkshire, though it spans the ceremonial counties of North Yorkshire and Cumbria. Most of the area falls within the Yorkshire Dales National Park, created in 1954 and now one of the fifteen National parks of Britain, but the term also includes areas to the east of the National Park, notably Nidderdale.

896_dales_03

The Dales is a collection of river valleys and the hills among them, rising from the Vale of York westwards to the hilltops of the main Pennine watershed. In some places the area extends westwards across the watershed, but most of the valleys drain eastwards to the Vale of York, into the Ouse and then the Humber.

896_dales_04The word dale comes from the Nordic/Germanic word for valley (dal, tal), and occurs in valley names across Yorkshire and Northern England. but the name Yorkshire Dales is generally used to refer specifically to the dales west of theVale of York and north of the West Yorkshire Urban Area.

Tourism

The majority of visitors are sightseers, with 75% visiting to drive around and 65% walking around. This indicates that most are there to take in the beauty of the surroundings. 26% also partake in hiking nature trails and spotting wildlife. 45% visit an information centre and 35% visit a castle or other historic site. 94% of visitors travel in a private mode of transport, with 90% using a car. The remaining 6% travel using public transport.

Yorkshire Dales National Park

In 1954 an area of 1,770 square kilometres (680 sq mi) was designated the Yorkshire Dales National Park. Most of theNational Park is in North Yorkshire, though part lies within Cumbria. The whole park lies within the historic 896_dales_01boundaries of Yorkshire, divided between the North Riding and the West Riding. The park is 50 miles (80 km) north-east of Manchester; Leeds and Bradford lie to the south, while Kendal is to the west, Darlington to the north-east and Harrogate to the south-east. A proposed westward extension of the park into Lancashire and Cumbria would encompass much of the area between the current park and the M6 motorway, coming close to the towns of Kirkby Lonsdale, Kirkby Stephen and Appleby-in-Westmorland. This proposal to add 162 square miles to the park has now been agreed by all interested parties and merely awaits ministerial approval. For the first time the Yorkshire Dales and Lake District national parks will be contiguous.

896_dales_05Over 20,000 residents live and work in the park, which attracts over eight million visitors every year. The area has a large collection of activities for visitors. For example, many people come to the Dales for walking or exercise. The National Park is crossed by several long-distance routes including the Pennine Way, the Dales Way, the Coast to Coast Walk and the latest national trail — the Pennine Bridleway. Cycling is also popular and there are several cycleways.

The Park has its own museum, the Dales Countryside Museum, housed in a conversion of the Hawes railway station in Wensleydale in the north of the area. The park has five visitor centres located in major destinations in the park.


Filed under: Article, British, Ephemera, Holidays, Illustration, Places, Transportation, Traveling Tagged: British Railways, North East Dales