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This Week’s Favourite Female Singer – Sippie Wallace

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749_Sippie Wallace _01Sippie Wallace (born as Beulah Thomas, November 1, 1898 – November 1, 1986) was an American singer-songwriter. Her early career in local tent shows gained her the billing "The Texas Nightingale". Between 1923 and 1927, she recorded over 40 songs for Okeh Records, many written by herself or her brothers, George and Hersal Thomas. Her accompanists included Louis Armstrong, Johnny Dodds, Sidney Bechet, King Oliver, and Clarence Williams. Among the top female blues vocalists of her era, Wallace ranked with Ma Rainey, Ida Cox, Alberta Hunter, and Bessie Smith.

In the 1930s, she left show business to become a church organist, singer, and choir director in Detroit, and performed secular music only sporadically until the 1960s, when she resumed her career. Wallace was nominated for a Grammy Award in 1982, and was inducted into the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame in 1993.

Biography

Wallace was born in Plum Bayou, Arkansas, one of 13 children, and later moved with her family as a child to Houston, Texas. In her youth Wallace sang and played the piano in Shiloh Baptist Church, where her father was a deacon, but in the evenings the children took to sneaking out to tent shows. By her mid-teens, they were playing in those tent shows. By performing in the various Texas shows, she built a solid following as a spirited blues singer.

Wallace came from a musical family: her brother George W. Thomas became a notable pianist, bandleader, composer, and music publisher; her other brother Hersal Thomas was a pianist and composer; and her niece (George’s daughter) Hociel Thomas was a pianist and composer.

Career

After following her brothers to Chicago in 1923, Wallace worked her way into the city’s bustling jazz scene. Her reputation led to a recording contract with Okeh Records in 1923. Wallace’s first recorded songs, "Shorty George" and "Up the Country Blues", the former written with her brother George, sold well enough to make Wallace a blues star in the early 1920s. Other successful recordings followed, including "Special Delivery Blues" (with Louis Armstrong), "Bedroom Blues" (written by George and Hersal Thomas), and "I’m a Mighty Tight Woman". Her younger brother Hersal died of food poisoning in 1926 at age 16.

Wallace moved to Detroit in 1929. Her husband Matt and brother George both died in 1936. Wallace for some 40 years was a singer and organ player at the Leland Baptist Church in Detroit. Mercury Records reissued "Bedroom Blues" in 1945. Aside from an occasional performance or recording date, Wallace did little in the blues until she launched a comeback in 1966 after her longtime friend Victoria Spivey coaxed her out of retirement and on the folk and blues festival circuit.

749_Sippie Wallace_02

In 1966 Wallace recorded an album on Halloween night, Copenhagen, Denmark, Women Be Wise, with Roosevelt Sykes and Little Brother Montgomery sharing the piano stool. Another 1966 album Sings the Blues, on the latter song, Wallace accompanied herself on piano; otherwise she is backed by either Roosevelt Sykes or Little Brother Montgomery on piano. Includes Wallace’s signature song, "Women Be Wise", "Don’t Advertise Your Man". The album helped inspire blues-pop singer Bonnie Raitt to take up the blues in the late 1960. In 1971 Raitt recorded a rendition of Sippie Wallace’s "Women Be Wise" on her self-titled album Bonnie Raitt. Wallace toured and recorded with Raitt in the 1970s and 1980s, while continuing to perform on her own. The bond between Wallace and Raitt helped bridge the gap between two generations of blues queens.

749_Sippie Wallace _01Wallace recorded on Louis Armstrong album, Louis Armstrong and the Blues Singers (1966), singing "A Jealous Woman Like Me", "Special Delivery Blues", "Jack O’Diamond Blues", "The Mail Train Blues" and "I Feel Good". Wallace also recorded an album of old blues standards with her friend Victoria Spivey, called Sippie Wallace and Victoria Spivey, which came out in 1970 on Spivey’s own self-named label. In 1981, Wallace recorded an album Sippie for Atlantic Records, which earned a her a 1983 Grammy nomination, and also won the 1982 W. C. Handy Award for Best Blues Album of the Year. Wallace’s backup group on were pianist Jim Dapogny’s Chicago Jazz Band, consisting of cornetist Paul Klinger, trombonist Bob Smith and Russ Whitman and Peter Ferran on reeds.

In 1966 and 1967 she appeared at the Newport Folk Festival, toured Europe with the American Folk Blues Festival, e.g. Copenhagen, Denmark in 1966, the Chicago Blues Festival, 1967, the Ann Arbor Blues Festival, 1972, and appeared at Lincoln Center in New York, 1977. She played herself in the documentary Jammin’ with the Blues Greats (1982).

On July 22, 1982 at the Montreux Jazz Festival, Sippie shared the stage with the King of the Blues, B.B. King, which was filmed and later broadcast.

Then in Ann Arbor, Michigan she got together with German boogie woogie pianist Axel Zwingenberger, with whom she recorded a studio album in 1983. Wallace included many of her own groundbreaking compositions as well as other classic blues songs, on his album, And the Friends of Boogie, Vol. 1: Sippie Wallace, released in 1984. In 1984 she traveled to Germany to tour with Zwingenberger, where they also recorded the only complete live album she ever did: An Evening With Sippie Wallace for Vagabond Records.

Text from Wikipedia 

749_Sippie Wallace_04 Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Bedroom blues
Sippie Wallace

Complete Recorded Works, Vol. 2 (1925-1945)
1945
?
Classic Female Blues
749_Sippie Wallace_04 Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Dead drunk blues
Sippie Wallace

Complete Recorded Works, Vol. 2 (1925-1945)
1925
?
Classic Female Blues
749_Sippie Wallace_04 Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
I’m a mighty tight woman
Sippie Wallace
 
Complete Recorded Works, Vol. 2 (1925-1945)
1927 
?
Classic Female Blues

Filed under: Article, Blues, Music Tagged: American singer-songwriters, Sippie Wallace

1958 Rollera

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750_microcar

Another Egon Brusch creation, the Rollera was built in France by a company called Societe Rollera Francaise. This car is one of only three known to survive. It had been used, for a time, as a children’s sandbox toy.

Text and image fra CNNmoney


Filed under: Automobiles, Facts, Retro technology, The fifties Tagged: 1958 Rollera, Micro cars, mini cars

Good Basic Thinking

The Sunday Comic – An Exciting First

The Lure Of The Mad Men – Part 17

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766_stupid ad_thumb[2]766_stupid ad2_thumb[2]766_stupid ad3_thumb[2]

The stupidity in these ads are so obvious that I feel comments are almost unnecessary. Enough to say is that the most brainless is Diesel themselves – Ted


Filed under: Advertising, Advertisments Tagged: Diesel, Mad Men

Julian Mandel

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752_Julian Mandel_03

"Julian Mandel" (1872–1935) is the identity given to one of the best-known commercial photographers of female nudes of the early twentieth century. Signature photography bearing that name became known in the 1910s and was published in Paris through the mid-1930s by such firms as Alfred Noyer, Les Studios, P-C Paris, and the Neue Photographische Gesellschaft.

Biographical information on Mandel is scarce and there has been speculation that the name is only a pseudonym.

752_Julian Mandel_05752_Julian Mandel_06

The models often are found in highly arranged classical poses, photographed both in-studio and outdoors. The images are composed artfully, with exquisite tones and soft use of lighting—showing a particular texture created by light rather than shadow.

Reportedly, Mandel was a member of, and participated in, the German avant-garde "new age outdoor" or "plein air" movement. Numerous pictures sold under this name feature natural settings, playing on the ultra pale, uniform skin tones of the women set against the roughness of nature.

752_Julian Mandel_01752_Julian Mandel_04

The nude photographs were marketed in a postcard-sized format, but as "A Brief History of Postcards" explains, "A majority of the French nude postcards were called postcards because of the size. They were never meant to be postally sent. It was illegal to send such images in the post (see History of erotic photography). The size enabled them to be placed readily into jacket pockets, packages, and books.

The full name, Julian Mandel, usually appears on the front of these card-sized photographs, being one of the few photographers of the day to stamp or sign a name on the front of works. This application of a marketing concept, contributes to the idea that the name might have been a pseudonym. Large numbers were sold.

752_Julian Mandel_02752_Julian Mandel_07

There is a belief nowadays that Julian Mandel was the pseudonym of Julian Walery, a well known photographer of the same period. Walery also created "plein-air" and exquisite deco-style nudes in the 1920s. It may well be that Walery used the name "Mandel" when selling work to publisher Alfred Noyer, for publishing as postcard-sized images. The use of the name "Julian" and the similarity of the imagery where nudes are concerned is too great to write off as mere coincidence.

Text from Wikipedia


Filed under: Models & starlets, Nudes, Photography Tagged: Glamour photography, Julian Mandel, Risqué Photography

Paul McCartney VS. Justin Bieber – I Love It :-D

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Paul McCartney does not want to work with Justin Bieber.  Word on the street is that Justin had decided that working with the Beatles legend would be just the thing to give him more street cred.  So Justin and his posse pitched the idea to Paul’s people of a Paul and Justin duet.  Justin figure Paul did it with Michael Jackson, why not him?

766_macca_bieber

When Paul heard the news he was horrified.  According to GLOBE, “Paul feared it would tarnish his stellar reputation.  He turned Justin down flat!” Not only did Paul nix the idea he refused to take Justin’s calls.  Paul basically thinks Justin is a flash in the pan and he is not an artist that should be taken seriously.

Justin is used to getting everything he wants, No one says NO to the Biebs so he is in a major sulk.  Paul’s refusal is driving him nuts and he is trying to find ways to make Paul see the light.  Justin intends to, “Hook up with people who write darker, edgier songs hoping one of the tunes will capture Paul’s attention.” Good luck with that Justin!  What do you think, will Justin convince Paul to record a duet with him or is he wasting his time?

Text found at HollywoodHiccups

Hit the comments and let us know your thoughts. – Ted


Filed under: Facts, Music, People Tagged: Justin Bieber, Paul McCartney

The Life & Times Of Aunt Mabel – Part 2

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005

No, no, NO! It is not what you think. Shame on you!

You thought this was a picture of Aunt Mabel describing a specific detail on the male anatomy, didn’t you. But it is definitely not so!

Aunt Mabel is merely boasting about how large the cucumbers in her greenhouse have grown. Who would have thought  she had such green fingers.

Ha!! You bought that one didn’t you. You should have known that the only thing that would make Aunt Mabel grow cucumbers is if they contained alcohol and we’re not talking just a little. Of course she’s  talking dirty as usual. And true to tradition young Johnny and his sister is sent off to bed and aunt Mabel is asked to leave.


Enhanced by Zemanta

Filed under: Humour, People, Tackieness Tagged: Anatomy, Aunt Mabel, Cucumbers, greenhouses, Male anatomy

Round Britain By Railway Posters – Lancashire Coast

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lancashire

Stretching from the Lune Estuary at Glasson Dock to the Kent Estuary at Arnside, the spectacular coastline of Lancashire provides surprising contrasts. 743_lanca01From stunning sunsets, dramatic landscapes and glorious views, to seaside towns, fish and chips and harbours steeped in maritime history, Lancashire quite simply has it all!

Genteel Lytham St Annes, maintains the elegance of Victorian England, with the glorious garden lined seafront, home to the charming Victorian Pier, Bandstand and Promenade and many historic sites 743_lanca03such as Lytham Hall and the famous Lytham Green Windmill.

Travel along the stunning coast northwards beyond Blackpool and Cleveleys and you will arrive at Fleetwood, a bustling harbour town with a rich marine heritage, best explored at the comprehensive Fleetwood Museum. Shop for bargains at the popular Fleetwood Freeport Village situated in the tranquil marina. Take a stroll 743_lanca02alongMorecambe’s superb five mile long promenade and enjoy the unique and stunning views across Morecambe Bayto the hills of the Lake District. Relax and unwind, simply breathe in the fresh coastal air and enjoy a unique experience breathing in the fresh coastal air or experience the thrill of sailing in this unique natural playground.

Text from VisitLancashire.com


Filed under: Article, British, Ephemera, Hollywood, Illustration, Places, Transportation, Traveling Tagged: British Railways, Lancashire Coast

The Strømmen Car

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744_strommenbilen

This two-seater is partly a mystery car. It is known that it was built in 1949 in Strømmen, a place in Skedsmo, Akershus, some 8 km from Oslo in Norway. The car weighed 200 kg and its top speed was 50 kmh. No ifo is available about the engine.

For the time being let’s call it the “Strømmenbil”. Looking at the picture an educated guess tells that builder has used a lot of plywood. No doors. It looks like a three-wheeler, but most probably had 2 rear wheels very close together, like the Isetta. Rear wheel driving (no differential) and front wheel steering? Who knows more? The registration number looks genuine, so the builder obviously got it approved for general traffic.

This picture is part of the collection of the Norsk Folkenmuseum and colorized.


Filed under: Automobiles, DIY project, Retro DIY projects, Retro technology, The forties Tagged: Homemade cars, Homemade Norwegian cars, Micro cars, mini cars

I’m A little Envious

This Week’s Retro Recipe – Southern Chicken Gumbo

This Week’s Retro DIY Project–A Classic Lap Desk

On This Day In 1964: Nelson Mandela Jailed For Life

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The leader of the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa, Nelson Mandela, has been jailed for life for sabotage. Seven other defendants, including the former secretary-general of the banned African National Congress (ANC), Walter Sisulu, were also given life prison sentences.

Crowds gathered silently outside the court building in Pretoria’s Church Square waiting for the verdict to be handed down. Hundreds of police patrolled the area. The Rivonia trial – named after the suburb of Johannesburg where several of the defendants were arrested – began eight months ago, with Mandela, 46, and his co-defendants proudly confessing their guilt to plotting to destroy the South African state by sabotage.

747_mandela2

As members of the ANC – the main African nationalist movement – they have campaigned for an end to the oppression of black South Africans. But the movement was banned in 1960 following the Sharpeville massacre and campaigners decided they had no choice but to resort to violent means.

Struggle for equal rights

Mandela – a lawyer by training – told the court earlier: "I do not deny that I planned sabotage. I did not plan it in a spirit of recklessness nor because I have any love of violence. I planned it as a result of a calm and sober assessment of the political situation that had arisen after many years of tyranny, exploitation and oppression of my people by the whites." His co-accused included: Walter Sisulu, Dennis Goldberg, Govan Mbeki, Raymond Mhlaba, Elias Mosoaledi, Andrew Mlangeni – all ANC officials and Ahmed Kathrada, the former leader of the South African Indian Congress.

747_mandela

Lawyer for the defendants, Harold Hansen QC said: "These accused represent the struggle of their people for equal rights. Their views represent the struggle of the African people for the attainment of equal rights for all races in this country."But the judge, President Quartus de Wet, said he was not convinced by their claim to have been motivated by a desire to alleviate the grievances of the African people in this country.

Judge de Wet said: "People who organise revolution usually plan to take over the government as well through personal ambition."However, he stopped short of the imposing the supreme penalty of death.The convicted men were cheered as they left court in a police lorry. The crowd was dispersed without any serious incident.

In Context

This was the second time Nelson Mandela had been tried for high treason – in 1956 he was charged but after a four year trial the case was dropped. There were demonstrations in Britain following the 1964 sentencing. A world petition calling for the prisoners’ release was handed to the United Nations Secretary General.

Nelson Mandela spent most of his 27 years behind bars serving hard labour in Robben Island prison off Cape Town. He was released in 1990, jointly awarded the Nobel peace prize with President FW de Klerk in 1993 and elected South Africa’s president in the country’s first multi-racial elections held in 1994.

He stepped down in favour of Govan Mbeki’s son Thabo in 1999 but continues to travel the world campaigning for peace.

Walter Sisulu died at the age of 90 in May 2003.

Text from BBC’s OnThisDay


Filed under: Article, Facts, People Tagged: African National Congress, Anti-apartheid struggle, Nelson Mandela

Centre Spreads From “La Vie Parisians”

Pre-War Classics Of The Road – Part 38

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1931 Wellesley Hornet Special

1932_wolseley

‘When the Wolseley Hornet was first planned, the inspiration was to provide the equivalent of first-class express travel in a small car for the first time,’ wrote The Autocar in 1931, announcing the new Hornet Special sports chassis, a ‘most seductive motor car’. In fact, the Hornet started life as a six-cylinder, 1271cc version of the Morris Minor with a rather whippy frame; the Hornet Special was only supplied in chassis form to the builders of sporting bodywork.

 

1933 Lancia Augusta

1933_lancia

Lancia’s first unitary construction saloon car was the Augusta, of 1933, which was normally seen with pillarless four-seater saloon coachwork, although a drophead version was also available. Its 1196cc, narrow V4 engine was good for around 70mph, at the expense of a 24mpg petrol consumption. Famous racing driver Tazio Nuvolari used an Augusta as his everyday transport.

1933 Morgan Super Sports

1933_morgan

Representing the ultimate stage in the development of the Morgan three-wheeler, this 1933 Super Sports has a front-start, ohv, 1100cc JAP engine mounted in the M-Type chassis, announced in 1930. Much lowered, like the old Brooklands Super Sports, the new chassis had detachable wheels all round and a three-speed gearbox with single chain final drive, rather than the fixed wheels and twin-ratio chain-and-dog transmission of the vintage Morgan three-wheelers.

 

1934 BMW 315/1 Sport

1934_bmw

BMW’s 1934 315/1 Sport was the marque’s first truly successful competition car, with a 1490cc, six-cylinder engine which, in triple-carburettor form, developed 40bhp. Its distinctive styling was widely copied by more prosaic machinery, like the 1172cc Ford Eifel produced at Ford’s Cologne factory.


Filed under: Automobiles, Retro technology, Transportation Tagged: 1931 Wolseley Hornet Special, 1933 Lancia Augusta, 1933 Morgan Super Sports, 1934 BMW 315/1 Sport

This Week’s Favourite Female Singer – Sippie Wallace

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749_Sippie Wallace _01Sippie Wallace (born as Beulah Thomas, November 1, 1898 – November 1, 1986) was an American singer-songwriter. Her early career in local tent shows gained her the billing "The Texas Nightingale". Between 1923 and 1927, she recorded over 40 songs for Okeh Records, many written by herself or her brothers, George and Hersal Thomas. Her accompanists included Louis Armstrong, Johnny Dodds, Sidney Bechet, King Oliver, and Clarence Williams. Among the top female blues vocalists of her era, Wallace ranked with Ma Rainey, Ida Cox, Alberta Hunter, and Bessie Smith.

In the 1930s, she left show business to become a church organist, singer, and choir director in Detroit, and performed secular music only sporadically until the 1960s, when she resumed her career. Wallace was nominated for a Grammy Award in 1982, and was inducted into the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame in 1993.

Biography

Wallace was born in Plum Bayou, Arkansas, one of 13 children, and later moved with her family as a child to Houston, Texas. In her youth Wallace sang and played the piano in Shiloh Baptist Church, where her father was a deacon, but in the evenings the children took to sneaking out to tent shows. By her mid-teens, they were playing in those tent shows. By performing in the various Texas shows, she built a solid following as a spirited blues singer.

Wallace came from a musical family: her brother George W. Thomas became a notable pianist, bandleader, composer, and music publisher; her other brother Hersal Thomas was a pianist and composer; and her niece (George’s daughter) Hociel Thomas was a pianist and composer.

Career

After following her brothers to Chicago in 1923, Wallace worked her way into the city’s bustling jazz scene. Her reputation led to a recording contract with Okeh Records in 1923. Wallace’s first recorded songs, "Shorty George" and "Up the Country Blues", the former written with her brother George, sold well enough to make Wallace a blues star in the early 1920s. Other successful recordings followed, including "Special Delivery Blues" (with Louis Armstrong), "Bedroom Blues" (written by George and Hersal Thomas), and "I’m a Mighty Tight Woman". Her younger brother Hersal died of food poisoning in 1926 at age 16.

Wallace moved to Detroit in 1929. Her husband Matt and brother George both died in 1936. Wallace for some 40 years was a singer and organ player at the Leland Baptist Church in Detroit. Mercury Records reissued "Bedroom Blues" in 1945. Aside from an occasional performance or recording date, Wallace did little in the blues until she launched a comeback in 1966 after her longtime friend Victoria Spivey coaxed her out of retirement and on the folk and blues festival circuit.

749_Sippie Wallace_02

In 1966 Wallace recorded an album on Halloween night, Copenhagen, Denmark, Women Be Wise, with Roosevelt Sykes and Little Brother Montgomery sharing the piano stool. Another 1966 album Sings the Blues, on the latter song, Wallace accompanied herself on piano; otherwise she is backed by either Roosevelt Sykes or Little Brother Montgomery on piano. Includes Wallace’s signature song, "Women Be Wise", "Don’t Advertise Your Man". The album helped inspire blues-pop singer Bonnie Raitt to take up the blues in the late 1960. In 1971 Raitt recorded a rendition of Sippie Wallace’s "Women Be Wise" on her self-titled album Bonnie Raitt. Wallace toured and recorded with Raitt in the 1970s and 1980s, while continuing to perform on her own. The bond between Wallace and Raitt helped bridge the gap between two generations of blues queens.

749_Sippie Wallace _01Wallace recorded on Louis Armstrong album, Louis Armstrong and the Blues Singers (1966), singing "A Jealous Woman Like Me", "Special Delivery Blues", "Jack O’Diamond Blues", "The Mail Train Blues" and "I Feel Good". Wallace also recorded an album of old blues standards with her friend Victoria Spivey, called Sippie Wallace and Victoria Spivey, which came out in 1970 on Spivey’s own self-named label. In 1981, Wallace recorded an album Sippie for Atlantic Records, which earned a her a 1983 Grammy nomination, and also won the 1982 W. C. Handy Award for Best Blues Album of the Year. Wallace’s backup group on were pianist Jim Dapogny’s Chicago Jazz Band, consisting of cornetist Paul Klinger, trombonist Bob Smith and Russ Whitman and Peter Ferran on reeds.

In 1966 and 1967 she appeared at the Newport Folk Festival, toured Europe with the American Folk Blues Festival, e.g. Copenhagen, Denmark in 1966, the Chicago Blues Festival, 1967, the Ann Arbor Blues Festival, 1972, and appeared at Lincoln Center in New York, 1977. She played herself in the documentary Jammin’ with the Blues Greats (1982).

On July 22, 1982 at the Montreux Jazz Festival, Sippie shared the stage with the King of the Blues, B.B. King, which was filmed and later broadcast.

Then in Ann Arbor, Michigan she got together with German boogie woogie pianist Axel Zwingenberger, with whom she recorded a studio album in 1983. Wallace included many of her own groundbreaking compositions as well as other classic blues songs, on his album, And the Friends of Boogie, Vol. 1: Sippie Wallace, released in 1984. In 1984 she traveled to Germany to tour with Zwingenberger, where they also recorded the only complete live album she ever did: An Evening With Sippie Wallace for Vagabond Records.

Text from Wikipedia 

749_Sippie Wallace_04 Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Bedroom blues
Sippie Wallace

Complete Recorded Works, Vol. 2 (1925-1945)
1945
?
Classic Female Blues
749_Sippie Wallace_04 Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Dead drunk blues
Sippie Wallace

Complete Recorded Works, Vol. 2 (1925-1945)
1925
?
Classic Female Blues
749_Sippie Wallace_04 Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
I’m a mighty tight woman
Sippie Wallace
 
Complete Recorded Works, Vol. 2 (1925-1945)
1927 
?
Classic Female Blues

Filed under: Article, Blues, Music Tagged: American singer-songwriters, Sippie Wallace

1958 Rollera

0
0

750_microcar

Another Egon Brusch creation, the Rollera was built in France by a company called Societe Rollera Francaise. This car is one of only three known to survive. It had been used, for a time, as a children’s sandbox toy.

Text and image fra CNNmoney


Filed under: Automobiles, Facts, Retro technology, The fifties Tagged: 1958 Rollera, Micro cars, mini cars

Good Basic Thinking

The Sunday Comic – An Exciting First