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She Was An Unusual Woman

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Ella Fitzgerald was not allowed to play at the popular Mocambo, in Hollywood, because of her race. Marilyn, who loved her music and supported civil rights, called the owner of the Mocambo and told him that if he booked Ella immediately, she would take a front table every night. The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. After that, Ella never had to play in a small jazz club again.

"She was an unusual woman – a little ahead of her times. And she didn’t know it." – Ella Fitzgerald about Marilyn Monroe

Image and text found at CharlieHadALittlWolf

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Filed under: Actresses, Facts, Hollywood, People Tagged: Ella Fitzgerald, Marilyn Monroe

Humorous Traffic Sign In Norway

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586_trafic signMayor of Marker Municipality, Kjersti Nythe Nilsen, is not going to remove the unorthodox pedestrian crossing signs. (Photo: Kreativiteket).

Most people are having a good laugh when they see the pedestrian crossing signs in the village of Ørje in Eastern Norway. Unfortunately, the Norwegian Public Roads Administration does not share the same form of humor and say they are going to remove them.

- If the Mayor does not take them down, we will remove them, says Head of Department Ivar Anton Christiansen to Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation, NRK.

The Monty Phyton sketch “Ministry of Silly Walks” from 1970, where John Cleese plays a minister who is responsible for developing silly walks, is the inspiration behind the idea of a group who call themselves “Kreativiteket”. They say that there is no deeper meaning behind the pedestrian signs, it is just everyday humor.

- I think the signs should be allowed. They are not to any nuisance and are very similar to normal pedestrian crossing signs. In fact, no one has noticed that we have changed them, after all, they have been there a couple of months, says Mayor Kjersti Nythe Nilsen.

She has no plans to remove the signs and must therefore resort to civil disobedience.

- This is a storm in a teacup. I think that they should be allowed to be placed where they are right now, she says.

It remains to see whether the Norwegian Public Roads Administration actually will travel to Ørje and remove them.

Text, image and video found at ThorNews

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Filed under: Facts, Norwegian, Norwegians Tagged: Strange traffic signs, Traffic signs

This Week’s Softdrink – Loranga

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Loranga is of the classic Swedish soft drinks introduced in the 50s that is still on the market. It used to be produced by Sandwalls ångbryggeri in Borås (I’m not sure if it was the first and only brewery to make Loranga but that would be my guess). Sandwalls brewery was bought and put to rest in the 70s/early 80s and Loranga has since been made by other brewerys. There was produced a whole set of Sandwalls happy families cards, so you can meet the whole family and the other charming Sandwalls families here.

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Text from MartinKlasch


Help Needed
I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

List of Soft drinks and sodas posted already
Visitors soft drinks and sodas suggestions and comments

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Filed under: Food & drinks, Soft drinks and sodas Tagged: Loranga, Swedish sodas, Swedish soft drinks

Moxie’s – Comic Strip Background – Part 8

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Moxie’s Café’s Suppliers

bogdan_small
Bogdan "Bogie"
Balakow

Soda Supplier
From The Bulgarian
Soda Mafia
petronella_small
Petronelle Augenie
Kopperud

Driver For
The Coffee Company
”The Brown Bean”
martin_small
Martin Melhus
Muggerud
Delivering Pastries
And Cakes From His
Own Bakery

Click the figures to get to know them better

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Filed under: Comix, Humour, Illustration, Moxie's - background stories Tagged: Moxie’s Café, Suppliers

Annette Stroyberg – Danish Actress

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589_Annette Stroyberg_01Annette Stroyberg (7 December 1936 – 12 December 2005) was a Danish actress. Her films included Les Liaisons Dangereuses (1959), which was directed by her first husband, Roger Vadim.

Annette Stroyberg was born on 7 December 1936 on Funen Island, Denmark, and is related to Danish actress Camilla Soeberg as the cousin of Camilla’s mother. Prior to 1958, Stroyberg appeared as a cover girl, most notably in an advertisement for Tuborg beer. In 1958, aged 21, she appeared in the film Les bijoutiers du clair de lune, directed by Roger Vadim, starring Gérard Philipe and Jeanne Moreau. During this production, she and Roger Vadim, a recent divorcé from Brigitte Bardot, fell in love and married on 17 June 1958. They gave birth to Nathalie Vadim, who went on to be a film director.

589_Annette Stroyberg_02Stroyberg and Vadim divorced in 1960. Having lived with Vittorio Gassman for a couple of years, and had liaisons with Alain Delon, Omar Sharif and Warren Beatty, Stroyberg married a French Moroccan, enrolled at the Sorbonne and divided her time between Paris and north Africa. When this marriage ended, she married a Greek shipping magnate, Gregory Callimanopulos, and settled in America. In February 1986, former husband Vadim published Bardot, Deneuve, Fonda — My Life With the Three Most Beautiful Women in the World, a book about Vadim’s relationships in which Stroyberg is written as passing "in and out of the other four lives" such that the there is at least as much in the book about Stroyberg as the three women named in the book title. After the break-up of her relationship with Callimanopulos in the early 1990s, she returned to Europe, living in Paris and Copenhagen, where she was part of the circle aroundQueen Margrethe and Prince Henrik. She had three children, one from each of her marriages.

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She died of cancer in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 12 December 2005, aged 69.

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Text from Wikipedia


Filed under: Actresses, Article, Models & starlets, Scandinavian Tagged: Annette Stroyberg, Danish actresses

Volugrafo 1946 “Bimbo 46”

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Although it looks like it just jumped off the pages of a comic book, the Volugrafo “Bimbo 46” wasn’t drawn by a cartoonist. It was one of the vehicles designed after the Second World War to meet the needs of the many people who yearned for movement, but couldn’t afford much.

Seeing a photo of it, at first you may think it was a scale model or toy. You might expect Donald Duck and his nephews, Huey, Dewey and Louie, to get in and drive off. In fact, this is a real car, designed by engineer Claudio Belmondo and made by Turin’s Officine meccaniche Volugrafo in 1946.

The small car, fitted with a 125cc four-stroke engine, has no doors and no reverse (when needed, you get out and maneuver the car – small, but by no means light at 125 kilograms – by sheer muscle power).

Only two meters long, it has two seats, four pedals – brake, accelerator, clutch, and ignition –, stick shift at the driver’s left, one driving wheel, and chain drive.

Instead of shock absorbers, it uses simple leaf springs to make bumpy rides slightly more comfortable.

And it makes for an unexpected and fun sight when it jogs along a country road… like a cartoon.

Photos via: www.ortenzifoto.it

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Text and images found at ItalianWays

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Filed under: Article, Automobiles, The forties Tagged: 1946, Italian cars, Micro cars, mini cars, Volugrafo Bimbo 46

Round Britain By Railway Posters – Jersey

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jersey

Jersey (/ˈɜrzi/, French: [ʒɛʁzɛ]; Jèrriais: Jèrri [ʒɛri], officially the Bailiwick of Jersey, French: Bailliage de Jersey), is a British Crown dependency just off the coast of Normandy, France.

590_jersey_02Jersey is part of the ancient Duchy of Normandy, and is ruled by the Duke of Normandy—a title held by the reigning Monarch of the United Kingdom, though unrelated to those duties as king or queen of the UK.

Jersey is a self-governing parliamentary democracy under a constitutional monarchy, with its own financial, legal and judicialsystems, and the power of self-determination.

The island of Jersey is the largest of the Channel Islands. Although the Bailiwicks of Jersey and Guernsey are often referred to collectively as the Channel Islands, the "Channel Islands" are not a constitutional or political unit. 590_jersey_03Jersey has a separate relationship to the British Crown from the other Crown dependencies of Guernsey and the Isle of Man. It is not part of the United Kingdom, and has an international identity separate from that of the UK but the United Kingdom is constitutionally responsible for the defence of Jersey. The Commission have confirmed in a written reply to the European Parliament in 2003 that Jersey is within the Union as a European Territory for whose external relationships the United Kingdom is responsible. Jersey is not fully part of theEuropean Union but has a special relationship with it, notably being treated as within the European Community for the purposes of free trade in goods.

590_jersey_06Origin of the name

The Channel Islands are mentioned in the Antonine Itinerary as the following: Sarnia, Caesarea, Barsa, Silia and Andium, but Jersey cannot be identified specifically because none corresponds directly to the present names. The name Caesarea has been used as the Latin name for Jersey (also in its French version Césarée) since William Camden‘s Britannia, and is used in titles of associations and institutions today. The Latin name Caesarea was also applied to the colony of New Jersey as Nova Caesarea.

Andium, Agna and Augia were used in antiquity.

Scholars variously surmise that Jersey and Jèrri derive from jarð (Old Norse for "earth") or jarl (earl), or perhaps a personal name,Geirr ("Geirr’s Island"). The ending -ey denotes an island (as in Guernsey or Surtsey).

History
Jersey history is influenced by its strategic location between the northern coast of France and the southern coast of England; the island’s recorded history extends over a thousand years.

590_jersey_05La Cotte de St Brelade is a Palaeolithic site inhabited before rising sea levels transformed Jersey into an island. Jersey was a centre of Neolithic activity, as demonstrated by the concentration of dolmens. Evidence of Bronze Age and early Iron Age settlements can be found in many locations around the island. In June 2012 it was announced that two metal detectorists had uncovered in Grouville what could be Europe’s largest hoard of Iron Age coins, which may be worth up to £10 M, after a search spanning 30 years. It was reported that the hoard weighed about three quarters of a tonne and could contain up to 50,000 Roman and Celtic coins. This came after an earlier find of 60 Iron Age coins, in the same area, by the same men.

590_jersey_07Further archaeological evidence of Roman influence has been found, in particular the coastal headland site at Le Pinacle, Les Landes, where remains of a primitive structure are attributed to Gallo-roman temple worship (fanum). Evidence for settled Roman occupation has yet to be established.

Jersey was part of Neustria with the same Gallo-Frankish population as the continental mainland. Jersey, the whole Channel Islands and the Cotentin peninsula (probably with theAvranchin) came formerly under the control of the duke of Brittany during the Viking invasions, because the king of the Franks was unable to defend them, however they 590_jersey_05remained in the archbishopric of Rouen. Jersey was invaded by Vikings in the ninth century, and was eventually annexed to the future Duchy of Normandy, together with the other Channel Islands, Cotentin and Avranchin, by William Longsword, count of Rouen in 933 and it became one of the Norman Islands. When William’s descendant, William the Conqueror, conquered England in 1066, the Duchy of Normandy and the kingdom of England were governed under one monarch. The Dukes of Normandy owned considerable estates in the island, and Norman families living on their estates established many of the historical Norman-French Jersey family names. King John lost all his territories in mainland Normandy in 1204 to King Philip II Augustus, but retained possession of Jersey and the other Channel Islands. The islands have been internally self-governing since then.

590_jersey_01Islanders travelled across the North Atlantic to participate in the Newfoundland fisheries in the late 16th century. In recognition for help given to him during his exile in Jersey in the 1640s, Charles II gave George Carteret, bailiff and governor, a large grant of land in the American colonies in between the Hudson and Delaware rivers which he promptly named New Jersey. It is now a state in the United States of America.

On 6 January 1781, a French invasion force of 2,000 men set out to take over the island – only half of the force arrived and landed. The battle by 9,000 men to defend the Island, although touch-and-go, and decisive, only lasted about 590_jersey_04half an hour. There were about thirty casualties on each side, and 600 French prisoners were taken. Both commanders were slain.

Trade laid the foundations of prosperity, aided by neutrality between England and France. The Jersey way of life involved agriculture, milling, fishing, shipbuilding, and production of woollen goods. 19th-century improvements in transport links brought tourism to the island.

During World War II, citizens were evacuated to the UK and Jersey was occupied by Germany from 1 July 1940 until 9 May 1945, when Germany surrendered. During this time the Germans constructed many fortifications using Soviet slave labour. After 1944 supplies from mainland France were interrupted by the D-Day landings and food on the island became scarce. The SS Vega was sent to the island carrying Red Cross supplies and news of the success of the Allied advance in Europe. The Channel Islands were one of the last places in Europe to be liberated.

Text from Wikipedia

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Filed under: British, Ephemera, Holidays, Traveling Tagged: Britsh railway, Jersey

Do It For Denmark

The 1953 Fiat 1110 Boat Car

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The Fiat 1110 Boat Car is not a true amphibious vehicle. It is better described as a dream-like boat on wheels. A bizarre mechanical hircocervus, never meant to sail across the seas, but to symbolize adventure with extravagance and humor. An odd car, parked on the dock like a small monument to travel by land and by sea.

The 1100 Boat Car – equipped with teak flooring, portholes, and lifesaver – was made in 1953 by Carrozzeria Coriasco in Turin for the “Scarani” Nautical School in Bologna.

A Boat Car to sail across the endless oceans of our imagination.

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Text and images found at ItalianWays

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Filed under: Automobiles, Design, Facts, Maritime history, Retro technology, The fifties Tagged: 1953, Fiat 1110 Boat Car

Those Magic 8-Tracks

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In the summer  of 1988 I went on round trip in Britain (no surprise there) with a good friend in his pearl white 1972 Opel Rally Kadet. Half an hour after we had landed in Newcastle the radio died and we were stuck with 5 old 8-tracks for sound; Janis Joplin, The Byrds, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Kinks and The Beach Boys. But then again, who needs a radio with a collection of such classic music to stuff into the trusty old 8-track player – Ted :-)

Image found at vavavoomrevisited


Filed under: Holidays, Music, Traveling Tagged: Stereo 8 cartridge tapes, Stereo 8 tapes

Retro DIY Project – A Dressing Table And Bench

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A DIY project published in Popular Science in January 1941page_ill

Only in the more expensive furniture stores could you find the equal of this distinctive modern dressing table and bench. It’s appeal is based upon a well-proportioned and simple exterior and careful selection of wood for grain and colour. A light wood such are birch, maple or blond walnut is suitable.

Plans and description in jpg and pdf format HERE


Filed under: DIY project, Retro DIY projects, The forties Tagged: Carpentry, Dressing table and bench, Hobby projects, Wood working

This Week’s Retro Recipe – Chilli Enchiladas

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 From the “Betty Crocker Recipe Card Library” published in 1971

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Your own soft tortillas rolled with chilli, onion and cheese. Accompany with shredded lettuce and chopped red tomatoes.

You’ll find the recipe HERE


Filed under: Food & drinks, Recipes, Retro Tagged: Chili Enchiladas, Diners

Sweet Ride

Mario Borgoni – Italian Artist & Commercial Artist

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Mario Borgoni was one of the early Italian artists who successfully made the transition from fine art to commercial art.

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His ornate illustrations used dramatic lighting and strong framing to enhance romantic compositions. Borgoni designed numerous hotel luggage labels which are now considered some of the finest visual representations of the golden age of travel.

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In 1905, he began a long relationship with the printing company Richter & C. In Naples Italy and eventually became its artistic director. Throughout his long career, he produced hundreds of posters, brochures and promotional materials for ENIT, the official Italian tourism agency.

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Filed under: Advertising, Art, Article, Paintings, Posters Tagged: Italian artists, Italian commercial artists, Mario Borgoni

Pre-War Classics Of The Road – Part 28

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1926 Pontiac Sedan

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They called the Pontiac ‘The Chief of the Sixes’ when it was launched in 1926 by General Motors as a lowerpriced running mate to the Oakland. Before long, Pontiac had supplanted the older marque in the popular estimation and, by 1930, Oakland had vanished from the scene. Pontiac, whose name derives from a mighty Indian chief of the mid 1700s, is the only marque to have been created, rather than acquired, by General Motors which has survived.

 

Rolls-Royce Pantom I landaulette by Hooper

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More formal coachwork on the Rolls-Royce Pantom I chassis. This landaulette was built by Hooper, another coachbuilder whose experience dated back to the days of the horse-drawn carriage. The spun aluminium wheel discs were common wear on Rolls-Royce cars, as they saved the chauffeur the thankless task of cleaning the wire-spoked wheels.

 

1927 Bugatti Type 44

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Developed from Bugatti’s first straight-eight, the Type 28 of 1922, the 3-litre Type 44 first appeared in 1927, In chassis form, the Type 44 cost 60,000 francs (then equivalent to around £550). Equally suitable for sporting or formal coachwork such as this four-light saloon, the Type 44 was capable of around 80mph in touring trim.

 

1927 Mércèdes supercharged 6.3-litre

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The Mércèdes company began experiments with supercharging on aero engines in 1915, and put their first supercharged sports cars into production in 1921. On these blown cars, the supercharger was not operational all the time, only cutting in with a banshee wail when the accelerator pedal was pushed hard down. The early supercharged Mércèdes cars proved dangerous, but the 1927 6.3-litre S26/120/180hp Mercedes-Benz was, perhaps, Germany’s finest sports car, winning S3 races in 1928.


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Filed under: Automobiles, Retro technology, Transportation, Vintage Science Tagged: 1926 Pontiac Sedan, 1927 Bugatti Type 44, 1927 Mércèdes supercharged 6.3-litre, Rolls-Royce Pantom I landaulette by Hooper

This Week’s Favourite Female Singer – Stevie Nicks

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Stephanie Lynn "Stevie" Nicks (born May 26, 1948) is an American singer-songwriter, who in the course of her work with Fleetwood Mac and her extensive solo career, has produced over forty Top 50 hits and sold over 140 591_nicks_03million albums. She was deemed "The Reigning Queen of Rock and Roll" and one of the "100 Greatest Singers of All Time" by Rolling Stone, and, as a member of Fleetwood Mac, was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998. As a solo artist, she has garnered eight Grammy Award nominations and, with Fleetwood Mac, a further five.

Nicks joined Fleetwood Mac in 1975, along with her then-romantic partner Lindsey Buckingham. Fleetwood Mac’s second album after the incorporation of Nicks and Buckingham, Rumours, released in 1977, was the best-selling album of all time the year of its release, and, to date, made claimed sales of 40 million copies worldwide which makes it the sixth biggest selling studio album of all time. The album remained at No.1 on the American albums chart for 31 591_nicks_01weeks, and reached the top spot in various countries worldwide. The album won Album of the Year in 1978 and produced four U.S. Top 10 singles, with Nicks’ "Dreams" being the band’s first and only U.S. number one hit.

Nicks began her solo career in 1981 with the album Bella Donna, which reached Platinum status less than three months after its release, and has since been certified quadruple-platinum. She has produced seven more solo studio albums to date, with her most recent titled In Your Dreams, and released on May 3, 2011. Nicks is known for her distinctive voice, mystical visual style, and symbolic lyrics.

 

Timespace- The Best of Stevie Nicks Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around 
Stevie Nicks
 
Timespace: The Best of Stevie Nicks 
1981 [Single]
1991 [CD] 
Soft Rock 

Download: 02-stop-draggin-my-heart-around.mp3

Timespace- The Best of Stevie Nicks Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Edge Of Seventeen
Stevie Nicks 
 
Timespace: The Best of Stevie Nicks
1982 [Single] 
1991 [CD]
Soft Rock

Download: 10-edge-of-seventeen.mp3

Timespace- The Best of Stevie Nicks Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Leather And Lace
Stevie Nicks duet with Don Henley
 
Timespace: The Best of Stevie Nicks
1982 [Single]
1991 [CD]
Soft Rock

Download: 11-leather-and-lace.mp3

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Filed under: Article, Music, Rock Tagged: Don Henley, Fleetwood Mac, Stevie Nicks

Widerøe’s Lillebror (Little Brother) Camping Trailer

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Little Ted spent many a summer holiday and week-end trips in a Lillebror camping trailer in the late fifties early sixties. An awful lot better than a tent but not quite a real camper but back then we loved that trailer and it is great to see that the retro camping trend has brought their popularity back – Ted

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Filed under: Camping, Holidays, Traveling Tagged: Fold-out camping trailers, Widerøe, Widerøe’s Lillebror

Elke Sommer – German Actress

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20236694Born Elke Baronesse von Schletz in Germany in 1940, Elke Sommer moved into acting from a modeling career. During the 1960s, she starred opposite the likes of Paul Newman (The Prize, 1963), Peter Sellers (A Shot in the Dark, 1964) and Bob Hope (Boy, Did I Get the Wrong Number, 1966). She also became a familiar face on the 1970s talk show circuit and presented her own painting instruction show on PBS.

Early Career
Actress, artist. Born Elke Schletz on November 5, 1940, in Berlin, Germany. Known for being a blonde bombshell, Elke Sommer appeared on screen with the likes of Peter Sellars, Paul Newman, and Bob Hope. The daughter of a Lutheran minister, she lost her father when she was fourteen. A few years later, Sommer went to London to work as a nanny. This job helped her learn English, which she hoped would help her achieve her goal of becoming a translator.

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While at the University of Erlangen, Sommer abandoned her studies to pursue a modeling career and then moved into acting. She made her film debut in the German film, Das Totenschiff (1959). In the early 1960s, she won over American audiences with her roles in the drama The Prize (1963) with Paul Newman and the comedy A Shot in the Dark (1964) with Peter Sellars. Sommer won a Golden Globe for her work on The Prize. In addition to being an actress, she was a popular sex symbol of the era. Sommer was compared to such other screen sirens as Sophia Loren and Brigitte Bardot.

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Career Highlights
Other notable film roles from this time include The Art of Love(1965) with James Garner, The Oscar (1966) with Milton Berle, andBoy, Did I Get the Wrong Number (1966) with Bob Hope. This last film was the start of a long working relationship with Hope. She went on to appear on many of his television specials over the next decade.

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In the 1970s, Sommer was a popular talk show guest, appearing onThe Mike Douglas Show, The Merv Griffin Show, Dinah!, and The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. She had roles in a number of feature films, including Zeppelin (1971), The Swiss Conspiracy(1979), and The Prisoner of Zelda (1979), which reunited her with Sellars. The next decade brought more work, largely in television. She made guest appearances on such shows as The Love Boat andSt. Elsewhere and had roles in several miniseries, including Inside the Third Reich (1982), Peter the Great (1985), and Anastasia: The Mystery of Anna (1986). Also around this time, she served as host of the syndicated show, Elke Sommer’s World of Speed and Beauty, which covered motor sports. She later hosted Painting with Elke Sommer, a 13-part instructional series, which was broadcast on public television.

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Creating art had long been a passion for Sommer. She once said, "I’d rather be known as a painter who acts than as an actress who paints." Over the years, her work has appeared in numerous shows at galleries and museums around the world and carries on aspects of traditional German folk art.

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Text from biography.com

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Filed under: Actresses, Article, Models & starlets, Nudes Tagged: Elke Baronesse von Schletz, Elke Sommer, German actresses

Grand-daddy’s Sauce – Part 28

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All posts material: “Sauce” and “Gentleman’s Relish” by Ronnie Barker – Hodder & Stoughton in 1977

Footer At Christmas

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Filed under: Ephemera, Illustration, Postcards, Vintage Tagged: Christmas, Football

The Lure Of The Mad Men – Part 7

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Ad from Saturday Evening Post, February 18th 1956
10.

Text from the ad:
Proud mothers, please forgive us if we too feel something of the pride of a new parent. For new Philip Morris, today’s Philip Morris, is delighting smokers everywhere. Enjoy the gentle pleasure, the fresh unfiltered flavour, of this new cigarette, born gentle, then refined to special gentleness in the making. Ask for new Philip Morris in the smart new package.

The worst thing about this ad is not the text even though it is bad enough, it is the illustration indicating that it’s safe for mothers to smoke in company with new-born children as long as they smoke the new Philip Morris. The Mad Men working for the tobacco industry was among the most heartless of them all and they kept on working like this long after it was proven without a shadow of a doubt that both active and passive smoking was severely harmful – Ted

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Filed under: Advertising Tagged: 1956, Mad Men, Philip Morris, Saturday Evening Post