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XXth Century Health & Pleasure Resorts Of Europe – Part 10

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From the 33rd edition of “XXth Century Health And Pleasure Resorts Of Europe” published in 1933

bok_front_small_thumb1ROADS OF THE FUTURE

Travel a hundred miles an hour in comfort. Roads forty feet wide…… Perfect surface…… No level crossings, cross-roads or villages….. Long lines of flood-lit surface at night….. Europe a network of perfect roads….. Is all this simply a vision of the future? It may be so, but the means to make this vision a reality exist. Such roads can be built, and what is more can be made to pay. Capital and labour are there; the demand for such roads exists; only enterprise is lacking to create a. vast network of specially built motor roads linking up all the main points in Europe. Various plans have been prepared, but what is wanted is a co-ordinated and uniform European system and not only odd disconnected stretches of special roads. Recently an International Bureau of Motor Roads has been set up with headquarters in Geneva to promote the idea and to co-ordinate the plans which have been made. This Bureau has issued a map of the roads it considers would constitute a rational European network to Governments, Automobile Clubs and other interested Associations, asking them for their comments and suggestions."

It is contemplated that such roads would consist of two tracks each twenty feet wide separated by a low wall from which the surface would be flood-lit at night. All passages through towns and villages, over level crossings and so forth, would be eliminated. Cross-roads would no longer exist, bridges being built over other roads: At the same time the streak of light constituted by such roads at night would be a guide to aircraft.

illus_006

Already a few such roads exist in Italy (Milan to the Lakes, Milan-Bergamo, Milan-Turin, Naples-Pompeii, etc.). These have yielded regular dividends on the capital invested. It is calculated that a charge of a penny per mile for small cars would be enough. Complete plans exist for building such roads from Calais to Paris and from Paris to Lille. On such flat ground there would only be a slight turn in every twenty-miles or so. A Toad from Hamburg to Basle which would later continue through to Italy is also planned. A company has been formed to build a special road from ·Evian to Geneva and Lyons and from Geneva to Besancon, Important interests are desirous of driving a tunnel under Mont Blanc from Les Houches in the Chamonix Valley to Courmayeur, thus providing the only motor road other than the Riviera one linking Western Europe to Italy throughout the year without shipping cars by train through the tunnels. Will Great Britain join in by a Channel tunnel for cars? Who knows! Probably our very up-to-date strategists might consider that such a tunnel would endanger Britain’s natural defences.

Of course objections at once occur to the mind; the sceptic may ask: "Is there really any demand for such horrible roads and this dreadful speed?" Anyone who has motored in some parts of the Continent will promptly reply that, speed or no speed, the danger of killing dogs and running into old women, the tediousness of mud and bumps, will amply justify the building of such roads.

illus_007

Could capital be obtained? Masses of savings are lying in bank deposit accounts seeking a safe investment. Yet – but would it be a safe one? Perhaps Government guarantees forinterest might be obtained. The State stands to gain by such roads being built. – And the cost? The cost of building a network of these roads could be met in about 20 years by a charge equivalent to one penny (gold) per gallon of petrol at present consumed in Europe. If the nineteenth century could find capital for railways, cannot the twentieth provide capital for such roads which would cost much less per mile to build? – Labour? Now is the time to build. Millions of unemployed in Europe ask no better than to be given a chance to work. In times of prosperity such work may not be required, but who can deny that a big enterprise of this nature in a time of depression is just what is wanted to encourage weary industries and enable the worker to consume more, thus setting the wheels of trade going again. The motorist will prove that the demand exists by being ready to pay for the facilities offered.

Such co-ordinated work would be one of the best means of breaking the" vicious circle" of under consumption and unemployment of the factors of production prevailing at present, and would have the additional advantage of welding dis-united Europe into something more like unity.

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Filed under: Article, Facts, Holidays, The thirties, Traveling Tagged: 1933, Europe, Roads, The continent

Victorian Inventions – Part 25

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From “Victorian Inventions” by Leonard De Vries published by American Heritage Press in 1972

part1_038_ill

Nowadays anyone who wishes to know his weight, have his portrait taken, his future foretold or who wants a travel insurance, a savings certificate, a newspaper, a packet of chocolate, or sweets, or even a squirt of perfume on his handkerchief, need have no more than a penny in his pocket. By inserting this coin into one of the ubiquitous automatic machines which one encounters everywhere it is veritable child’s play to become the owner of one of these fine things.

And now an apparatus has also been invented which will permit us to enjoy electric light for fully half an hour, and that on payment of a negligible sum. If a penny is inserted in the slot marked A it will fall into B and then one can depress the knob which bears the legend ‘Push hard’. This movement winds up a clockwork motor which connects up a circuit of several accumulators and a lamp for the space of half an hour. If the device is out of order if, for example, a filament is broken the coin will tumble out again at C.

The object of the inventors is to give travellers in trains and aboard ships a cheap but abundant supply of soft light for a limited time whenever they require it, thus enabling them to read, write, play games or pursue any of the hundred and one activities with which we can while away the time when on a journey. In this respect the electric incandescent lamp puts its humble sister in the shade-we refer, of course, to the gas lamp which in our third class carriages scarcely affords sufficient light to light a cigar by.


And the bloody idea caught on didn’t it. In motels, hotels, on boats, at airport or anywhere else a bastard can installed a coin slot you have to pay for TV viewing, gas, hot water or whatever – Ted ;-)
Filed under: Article, Facts, Retro technology, Vintage Science Tagged: Automats, Electric light, Victorian inventions

Volvo 122S Amazon Convertible 1963 By Jacques Coune

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531_amazon_01OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA         OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Jacques Coune (Born in 1924) started his car workshop in the mid ’50s at the avenue de la Couronne in Brussels, where he took care of exclusive sport cars like Jaguars, Aston Martins and other valuable cars, but also more regular and less expensive production cars. His clients were mainly rich people looking for individual transport.

One of the more known Coune creations was the Coune MGB Berlinette of which 56 were produced during 1963-1968 before British Leyland presented their own MGB GT Coupe. Coune also built a BMW 700 Combi, a BMW 1800 Combi, a Mercedes 220 SE Estate, a single Peugeot 404 Break, five Volvos Amazone Convertible and a special one-off MGB Targa, called the Gemini Spyder. Jacques Coune had his own booth (in 1963, 1964, 1965) at the autosalon in Brussels where he presented his unique creations to the public.

Coune also build Amazone roadsters, but I was unable to find any decent picture of one – Ted

Text and images from CoachBuild.com

The Volvo Amazon, as it is simply called in Scandinavia, was a hugely popular car back when I was a young man and one like this customized one on these picture would have been a chick magnet of almost magical proportions. Convertibles were scarce on the ground in Norway back then – Ted ;-)


Filed under: Automobiles, Facts, The sixties Tagged: 1963, Convertibles, Swedish automobiles, Volvo 122S, Volvo 122S Amazon, Volvo Amazon

A Practical Bike

Moxie’s – Comic Strip Background – Part 4

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Moxie’s Café’s Regular Patrons – Part 3

erling_small

Erling Eilert
Torp Ivertzen
Copy Write
Aslak Armand’s 
Father

bertram_small

Bertram
Normann-Holte

Shop Teacher
Bertil Bertram’s
Father

aslak_smal

Aslak Armand
Torp Ivertzen
Student

Erling Eilert’s 
Son

bertil_small

Bertil Bertram
Normann-Holte

Student
Bertram’s
Son

magda_small

Magda Helene
Heidemyr
Documentarian
In The National
Library

kaare_ronny_small

Kåre-Ronny
Bottolfsen

Lorry Driver/
Elvis Presley
Impersonator

Click the figures to get to know them better


Filed under: Comix, Humour, Illustration, Moxie's - background stories Tagged: Moxie's, Regular patrons

This Week’s Softdrink – Cuba Cola

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493_cuba_cola_01

Until 1953, cola drinks were banned in Sweden because they contained phosphoric acid and caffeine. Interest in the American taste success, however,493_cuba_cola_02 was high in Sweden and when the ban was lifted Malmö company Saturn was well prepared. They already had a drink prepared and summer of 1953, they launched the soda Cuba Cola. Thus, they came before the American competitor, Coca Cola introduced in the country only three months later. Cuba Cola is thus the oldest cola drink in Sweden.

Text from cubacola.nu


Help Needed
I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

List of Soft drinks and sodas posted already
Visitors soft drinks and sodas suggestions and comments


Filed under: Fifties chow & drinks, Soft drinks and sodas Tagged: Cuba Cola, Swedish sodas, Swedish softdrinks

Evolution

Alfred Cheney Johnston’s Ziegfeld Girls

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Barbara Stanwyck, Ziegfeld girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston, ca. 1924
Barbara Stanwyck

Caja Eric, Ziegfeld girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston, ca. 1931Claudia Dell, Ziegfeld girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston, ca. 1928 _2
Kaja Eric – Claudia Dell
 
Claudia Dell, Ziegfeld girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston, ca. 1928Dolores Costello, Ziegfeld girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston, ca. 1923
Claudia Dell – Dolores Costello
Dorothy Wegman, Ziegfeld girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston, ca. 1925Hazel Forbes, Ziegfeld girl & Miss United States, by Alfred Cheney Johnston, ca. 1928Helen Lee Worthing, Ziegfeld girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston, 1920
Dorothy Wegman – Hazel Forbes – Helen Lee Worthing
Jeanne Eagels, Ziegfeld girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston, ca. 1923Marion Davies, Ziegfeld girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston, 1924Ruby Keeler, Ziegfeld girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston, ca. 1929
Jeanne Eagles – Marion Davis – Ruby Keeler
Mary Eaton, Ziegfeld girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston, ca. 1921Muriel Finlay, Ziegfeld girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston, ca. 1928Muriel Finlay, Ziegfeld girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston, ca. 1928_2
Mary Eaton – Muriel Finley – Muriel Finley
00266, 11/30/10, 9:47 AM,  8C, 5502x6959 (203+550), 100%, Custom, 1/160 s, R43.3, G31.2, B57.4
Kay English, Ziegfeld girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston, ca. 1929Ziegfeld girl Jean Ackerman by Alfred Cheney Johnston, ca. 1928
Drucilla Strain – Kay English – Jean Ackerman

All images found on trialsanderrors’s photostream on Flickr

You can read a whole book on the Ziegfeld Girls here:
ZIEGFELD GIRL Image and icon in culture and cinema
Published by Duke University Press in 1999

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Filed under: Image Gallery, Models & starlets Tagged: Alfred Cheney Johnston, Ziegfeld girls

Joseph Kuhn-Régnier – French Illustrator

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534_joseph kuhn-regnier-14

Joseph Kuhn-Régnier, born Joseph Louis Wilfrid Kuhn-Regnier (10 December 1873 – 1940), was a French illustrator who worked in Paris. His work is recognizable by his characters inspired by Greek and classical art. He contributed full-page colored illustrations and advertisements to society magaziness between 1911 and 1934 such as La Vie Parisienne, Fantasio, and Le Sourire. In 1934 he created colored illustrations for four volume collection The Works of Hippocrates, published by Javal & Bourdeaux in Paris. He also created illustrations for the erotic work The Songs of Bilitis in the 1930s.

534_joseph kuhn-regnier-13534_joseph kuhn-regnier-02534_joseph kuhn-regnier-15534_joseph kuhn-regnier-10534_joseph kuhn-regnier-11534_joseph kuhn-regnier-12534_joseph kuhn-regnier-06534_joseph kuhn-regnier-07534_joseph kuhn-regnier-09534_joseph kuhn-regnier-01534_joseph kuhn-regnier-03534_joseph kuhn-regnier-04

Text from Wikipedia


Filed under: Illustration, Image Gallery, Nudes Tagged: French illustrators, Joseph Kuhn-Régnier

The Importance Of Correct Spelling

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544_monkA young monk arrives at the monastery. He is assigned to helping the other monks in copying the old canons and laws of the church by hand.

He notices, however, that all of the monks are copying from copies, not from the original manuscript. So, the new monk goes to the head abbot to question this, pointing out that if someone made even a small error in the first copy, it would never be picked up! In fact, that error would be continued in all of the subsequent copies.

The head monk, says, "We have been copying from the copies for centuries, but you make a good point, my son."

He goes down into the dark caves underneath the monastery where the original manuscripts are held as archives in a locked vault that hasn’t been opened for hundreds of years. Hours go by and nobody sees the old abbot. So, the young monk gets worried and goes down to look for him. He sees him banging his head against the wall and wailing. "We missed the R !” “We missed the R ! We missed the R !"

His forehead is all bloody and bruised and he is crying uncontrollably. The young monk asks the old abbot, "What’s wrong, father?" With A choking voice, the old abbot replies, "The word was… "CELEBRATE !!!"

Found on a group on Facebook


Filed under: Humour Tagged: A missed letter, Celebate, Celebrate, Monks

Round Britain By Railway Posters – Hereford

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hereford

Hereford Listeni/ˈhɛrɨfəd/ is a cathedral city, civil parish and county town of Herefordshire, England. It lies on the River Wye, approximately 16 miles (26 km) east of the border with Wales, 24 miles (39 km) southwest of Worcester, and 23 miles (37 km) northwest of Gloucester. With a population of 53,516 people, it is the largest settlement in the county.

The name "Hereford" is said to come from the Anglo-Saxon "here", an army or formation of soldiers, and the "ford", a place for crossing a river. If this is the 534_hereford_04origin it suggests that Hereford was a place where a body of armed men forded or crossed the Wye. TheWelsh name for Hereford is Henffordd, meaning "old road", and probably refers to the Roman road and Roman settlement at nearbyStretton Sugwas.

An early town charter from 1189 granted by Richard I of England describes it as "Hereford in Wales". Hereford has been recognised as a city since time immemorial, with the status being reconfirmed as recently as October 2000.

534_hereford_05Hereford became the seat of Putta, Bishop of Hereford, some time between AD 676 and 688, after which the settlement continued to grow due to its proximity to the border between Mercia and Wales, becoming the Saxon capital of West Mercia by the beginning of the 8th century.

Hostilities between the Anglo-Saxons and the Welsh came to a head with the Battle of Hereford in 760, in which the Britons freed themselves from the influence of the English. Hereford was again targeted by the Welsh during their conflict with the Anglo-Saxon King Edward the Confessor in AD 1056 when, supported by Viking allies, Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, King of Gwynedd and Powys, marched on the town and put it to the torch before returning home in triumph. Hereford had the only mint west of the Severn in the reign of Athelstan (924–39), and it was to Hereford, then a border town, that Athelstan summoned the leading Welsh princes.

534_hereford_01The present Hereford Cathedral dates from the early 12th century, as does the first bridge across the Wye. Former Bishops of Hereford includeSaint Thomas de Cantilupe and Lord High Treasurer of England Thomas Charlton.

The city gave its name to two suburbs of Paris, France: Maisons-Alfort (population 54,600) and Alfortville (population 36,232), due to a manor built there by Peter of Aigueblanche, Bishop of Hereford, in the middle of the 13th century.

Hereford, a base for successive holders of the title Earl of Hereford, was once the site of a castle, Hereford Castle, which rivalled that of Windsor in size and scale. This was a base for repelling Welsh attacks and a secure stronghold for English kings such as King Henry IV when on campaign in the Welsh Marches against Owain Glyndŵr. The castle was dismantled in the 18th century and landscaped into Castle Green.

534_hereford_03After the Battle of Mortimer’s Cross in 1461, during the Wars of the Roses, the defeated Lancastrian leader Owen Tudor (grandfather of the future Henry VII of England) was taken to Hereford by Sir Roger Vaughan and executed in High Town. A plaque now marks the spot of the execution. Vaughan was later himself executed, under a flag of truce, by Owen’s son Jasper.

During the civil war the city changed hands several times. On 30 September 1642 Parliamentarians led by Sir Robert Harley and Henry Grey, 1st Earl of Stamford occupied the city without opposition. In December they withdrew to Gloucester because of the presence in the area of a Royalist army under Lord 534_hereford_01Herbert. The city was again occupied briefly from 23 April to 18 May 1643 by Parliamentarians commanded by Sir William Waller but it was in 1645 that the city saw most action. On 31 July 1645 a Scottish army of 14,000 underAlexander Leslie, 1st Earl of Leven besieged the city but met stiff resistance from its garrison and inhabitants. They withdrew on 1 September when they received news that a force led by King Charles was approaching. The city was finally taken for Parliament on 18 December 1645 by Colonel Birch and Colonel Morgan. King Charles showed his gratitude to the city of Hereford on 16 September 1645 by augmenting the city’s coat of arms with the three lions of Richard I of England, ten Scottish Saltires signifying the ten defeated Scottish regiments, a very rare lion crest on top of the coat of arms signifying "defender of the faith" and the even rarer gold-barred peer’s helm, found only on the arms of one other municipal authority: those of the City of London.

534_hereford_06Nell Gwynne, actress and mistress of King Charles II, is said to have been born in Hereford in 1650 (although other towns and cities, notably Oxford, also claim her as their own); Gwynn Street is named after her. Another famous actor born in Hereford is David Garrick(1717–1779).

The Bishop’s Palace next to the Cathedral was built in 1204 and continually used to the present day. Hereford Cathedral School is also one of the oldest schools in England.

It is now known chiefly as a trading centre for a wider agricultural and rural area. Products from Hereford include: cider, beer, leathergoods, nickel alloys, poultry, chemicals, and cattle, including the famous Hereford breed.

Text fra Wikipedia


Filed under: British, Ephemera, Holidays, Traveling Tagged: British Railways, Hereford

Quantas Empire Airways’ Flying Boats

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525_quantas_01

The Qantas story is inextricably linked with the development of civil aviation in Australia. It begins with fragile biplanes carrying one or two passengers in open cockpits and progresses to the new Airbus A380s flying some 450 people half way around the world in a day.

But, it is a story of human endeavor, not just machines. A few determined individuals overcame formidable obstacles to establish the Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Services Ltd (QANTAS). Supported by committed staff and loyal customers, the airline persevered through war and peace to serve the nation and build an enterprise. The Qantas story is about the people who have created its exciting and productive history – its staff, its customers and the excellence of its business partners and key suppliers…
525_quantas_03

You don’t see them much nowadays – hardly any at all in fact. Lasting little more than 12 years, the golden age of the flying boat in Australian aviation history was as brief as it was dramatic. Luxurious Empire Class flying boats that were designed to open international air routes and strengthen ties within the British Empire became targets of Japanese attacks on Australian soil during the World War II. Flying boats set records, suffered tragedy and played a crucial role in keeping Australia connected with the outside world. Following the war, however, the development of longer-range land-based aircrafts signalled a slow demise in the role of the flying boat in commercial aviation.

525_quantas_02

Text from Quantas and ClubMarine


Filed under: Aviation, The forties, The thirties Tagged: Flying boats, Quantas

Poster For Job Cigarette Paper – Alphonse Mucha – 1896

The Retro DIY Project – Three Model Planes

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page_illThis single-stick airplane model of simple parts is so designed that it can be converted into twenty different types of flying models. It opens new fields for the model enthusiast to conquer. Through building it, the beginner can master a variety of construction methods while actually expending the time and material necessary to make only one. model; and the expert can adapt the principles for use on any pet model of his own. To the best of the writer’s knowledge, the model is the first of its type.

Descriptions and plans in
jpg and pdf format
HERE

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Filed under: DIY project, Retro DIY projects, Retro technology, Toys Tagged: Model airplanes, Model building

This Week’s Retro Recipe – Cock-A-Leekie Soup

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small_ill
As the name suggests, this soup was originally made with a cockerel. Nowadays a chicken is more than an adequate substitute. A hearty main-dish soup – absolutely delightful on a cold winter’s day, with good conversation and warm, crusty bread.

Recipe HERE


Filed under: Food & drinks, Recipes, The seventies Tagged: Cock-a-leekie soup, Soups

The Brighton And Rottingdean Seashore Electric Railway

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529_longlegs_04

The Brighton and Rottingdean Seashore Electric Railway was a unique coastline railway in Brighton, England that ran through the shallow waters of the English Channel between 1896 and 1901.

529_longlegs_01Background and construction

Magnus Volk, its owner, designer and engineer, had already been successful with the more conventional Volk’s Electric Railway, which had then not been extended east of Paston Place. Facing unfavourable geography, Volk decided to construct a line through the surf from a pier at Paston Place to one at Rottingdean. This was also home to Volk’s Seaplane Station which was used by his son George Herbert Volk.

529_longlegs_03The railway itself consisted of two parallel 2 ft 8 1⁄2 in (825 mm) gauge tracks, billed as 18 ft (5.5 m) gauge, the measurement between the outermost rails. The tracks were laid on concrete sleepers mortised into the bedrock. The single car used on the railway was a 45 by 22 ft (13.7 by 6.7 m) pier-like building which stood on four 23 ft (7.0 m)-long legs. The car weighed 45 long tons (50 short tons; 46 t). Propulsion was by electric motor. It was officially named Pioneer, but many called it Daddy Long-Legs. Due to regulations then in place, a qualified sea captain was on board at all times, and the car was provided with lifeboats and other safety measures.

Construction took two years from 1894 to 1896. The railway officially opened 28 November 1896, but was nearly destroyed by a storm the night of 4 December. Volk immediately set to rebuilding the railway including the Pioneer, which had been knocked on its side, and it reopened in July 1897.

529_longlegs_02In use
The railway was popular, but faced difficulties. The car was slowed considerably at high tide, but Volk could never afford to improve the motors. In 1900, groynes built near the railway were found to have led to underwater scouring under the  sleepers and the railway was closed for two months while this was repaired. Immediately afterward, the council decided to build a beach protection barrier, which unfortunately required Volk to divert his line around the barrier. Without funds to do so, Volk closed the railway. In 1901 the right-of-way was broken up for construction of the barrier. One further attempt was made to raise money for a conventional over-water viaduct along roughly the same route.

Legacy
The track, car and other structures were sold for scrap, but some of the concrete sleepers can still be viewed at low tide. Eventually Volk’s Electric Railway was extended onshore, covering a portion of the same distance; it remains in operation.

A model of the railway car is on display (along with a poster for the railway) in the foyer of the Brighton Toy and Model Museum.

Text from Wikipedia

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Filed under: Article, British, Retro technology, Vintage Science Tagged: Brighton And Rottingdean Seashore Electric Railway

Some Comforting Memories Of Summer

This Week’s Favourite Female Singer – Julie Driscoll

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536_Julie Driscol_01Julie Tippetts (born Julie Driscoll, 8 June 1947, London, England) is an English singer and actress, known for her 1960s versions of Bob Dylan‘s "This Wheel’s on Fire", and Donovan‘s "Season of the Witch", both with Brian Auger & The Trinity. Along with The Trinity, she was featured prominently in the 1969 television special 33 1/3 Revolutions Per Monkee, singing "I’m a Believer" in a soul style with Micky Dolenz. She and Auger had previously worked in Steampacket, with Long John Baldry and Rod Stewart.

"This Wheel’s on Fire" reached number five in the United Kingdom in June 1968. With distortion, the imagery of the title and the group’s dress and performance, this version came to represent the psychedelic era in British music. Driscoll recorded the song again in the early ’90s with Adrian Edmondson as the theme to the BBC comedy series Absolutely Fabulous, whose main characters are throwbacks to that era.

Since the 1970s, Driscoll has concentrated on experimental vocal music, married jazz musician Keith Tippett and collaborated with him. Her name is now ‘Julie Tippetts’, thus using the original spelling of her husband’s surname. She participated in Keith Tippett’s big band 536_Julie Driscol_03Centipede and, in 1974, took part in Robert Wyatt‘s Theatre Royal Drury Lane concert; released a solo album, Sunset Glow in 1975; and was lead vocalist on Carla Bley‘s album Tropic Appetites and in John Wolf Brennan‘s "HeXtet".

Later in the 1970s, she toured with her own band, and recorded and performed as one of the vocal quartet ‘Voice’, with Maggie Nichols, Phil Minton and Brian Eley.

In the early 1980s, Julie Tippetts was a guest vocalist on an early single by pop-jazz band Working Week, on the song "Storm of Light", which brought them the attention of a wider audience. Though the band later continued with other vocalists – notably with Tracey Thorn of Everything but the Girl fame and the band’s long term staple, another Julie, last name Roberts – it was this single that marked the band’s arrival and a brief infatuation from the British and European public with stylish pop incorporating a strong jazz flavor, thus marking Julie Tippetts, née Driscoll, as a vocalist for every age.

cover Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Wheels On Fire
Julie Driscol, Brian Auger & The Trinity
 
Open 
1967
1967
Rock/Rhytm ‘n Blues 

Download: 14-road-to-cairo1.mp3

cover Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Road To Cairo
Julie Driscol, Brian Auger & The Trinity
 
Open
1967
1967
Rock/Rhytm ‘n Blues

Download: 13-this-wheels-on-fire.mp3

cover Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Season Of The Witch 
Julie Driscol, Brian Auger & The Trinity
 
Open
1967
1967
Rock/Rhytm ‘n Blues

Download: 10-season-of-the-witch.mp3

I apologise for the sound quality on this record, but I’ve had it since 1967 – Ted ;-)

Text from Wikipedia

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Filed under: British, Jazz, Music, Popular music, Rock Tagged: British singers, Julie Driscoll

Pre-War Classics Of The Road – Part 24

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1923 Morris Cowley

1923_morris 
The car which established Morris as a mass-producer was the Morris Cowley, which first appeared in April 1915, equipped with an American built Continental Red Seal engine. But the most famous of these ‘Bullnose’ Cowleys appeared in July 1919, and used a 1548cc engine built by Hotchkiss of Coventry. Between 1919 and 1923, the Cowley had combined head/side lamps mounted on the front mudguards.

 

1923 Tatra

1923_tatra 
The 65hp Tatra of 1923 was in fact a development of the pre-war Nesselsdorf Type U (which had utilised front wheel brakes as early as 1909). and was the work of Hans Ledwinka. Powered by a 6-litre. ohc engine. this was the last Tatra model of conventional design because once Ledwinka began designing for his old company again in 1923, he introduced the famous backbone-frame. air-cooled. swing-axle cars.

 

1924 Opel 4/12PS “Laubfrosch” (tree frog)

1924_opel 
Opel were the first German company to build cars on a moving production line (in 1924), and the car which they built, the 4/12PS, was a close copy of the successful 5cv Citroen. Painted bright green, the little Opel was nicknamed Laubfrosch (Tree Frog), and sold at 4000 marks (about £200). By 1925, the Opel factory at Russelsheim was producing 125 Laubfrosche a day, and the model gave the company adominant 37.5% of the German market by the year 1928.

 

1924 Peugeot 172BS Grand Sport

1924_peugeot 
This delightful little French cyclecar is the 1924 Peugeot 172BS Grand Sport, derived from the original Quadrilette of 1919, a tandem-seated, 628cc economy car. This car was one of the first Ouadrilettes to have a 719cc power unit. A stripped version of this model won the 750cc class in the Grand Prix MC de Lyon in 1924, driven by one M. Ducreux.

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Filed under: Automobiles, Retro technology, Transportation, Vintage Science Tagged: 1923 Morris Cowley, 1923 Tatra, 1924 Opel 4/12PS “Laubfrosch” (tree frog), 1924 Peugeot 172BS Grand Sport

This Is Why I Stick To Beer