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It’s delicious, And The Choice Is Yours…..

The Positive Limit In Polite Comedy….

Who Said….

Ford Edsel 1957 Car Models

The Forgotten Ones – Barbara Bach

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Barbara Bach
(born Barbara Goldbach; August 27, 1947) is an American actress and model known as the Bond girlAnya Amasova from the James Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me (1977). She subsequently starred in Force 10 from Navarone (1978) with Robert Shaw and Harrison Ford. She is married to former Beatle Ringo Starr.

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Early life

Bach was born in Rosedale, Queens, and grew up in Jackson Heights, the daughter of Marjorie and Howard I. Goldbach (1922–2001), a policeman. Her mother is Irish Catholic, while her father was Jewish (from a family from Germany, Austria, and Romania). She attended a Catholic high school, Dominican Commercial, in Jamaica, Queens. Bach left school at age 16 to become a model. She is not related to Catherine Bach, whose birth name is Bachman.

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Career

In 1972, Bach co-starred with two other Bond girls, Claudine Auger and Barbara Bouchet in the mystery La Tarantola dal ventre nero (a giallo film) and had small roles in other Italian films.

In 1977, her role as the Russian spy Anya Amasova in The Spy Who Loved Me gained her recognition as an international sex symbol. Bach remarked after the film that Bond is "a chauvinist pig who uses girls to shield him against bullets." The following year she appeared in the movie Force 10 from Navarone. She lost a role to actress Shelley Hack when she auditioned for the television series Charlie’s Angels. Bach has 28 films to her credit. She has not worked as an actress since the mid-1980s. She featured in her own pictorial in Playboy in June 1977, and she was the cover girl and had her own pictorial in January 1981. She also had a cameo in a September 1987 special issue on the Bond girls.

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Filmography

Year Title Role
1968  L’Odissea (a.k.a. The Adventures of Ulysses) Nausicaa
1971 Mio padre Monsignore Chiara
 La Tarantola dal ventre nero (a.k.a. Black Belly of the Tarantula) Jenny
 La Corta notte delle bambole di vetro (a.k.a. Paralyzed / Short Night of Glass Dolls) Mira Svoboda
 Un peu de soleil dans l’eau froide (a.k.a. A Few Hours of Sunlight / A Little Sun in Cold Water) Héloïse/Elvire
1972  I Predatori si muovono all’alba Helen
1973  Paolo il caldo (a.k.a. The Sensual Man / The Sensuous Sicilian) Anna
 Il Maschio ruspante Rema
 L’ Ultima chance (a.k.a. Last Chance / Motel of Fear) Emily
1974  Il Cittadino si ribella (a.k.a. Street Law / The Citizen Rebels) Barbara
1975  Il Lupo dei mari (a.k.a. Legend of the Sea Wolf / Larsen, Wolf of the Seven Seas) Maud Brewster
1977  Ecco noi per esempio Ludovica
 The Spy Who Loved Me Anya Amasova
1978  Force 10 from Navarone Maritza Petrovich
1979  L’ Isola degli uomini pesce (a.k.a. Island of the Fishmen / Screamers) Amanda Marvin
 L’ Umanoide (a.k.a. The Humanoid) Lady Agatha
 Jaguar Lives Anna Thompson
 Il Fiume del grande caimano (a.k.a. Alligators / The Big Alligator River / The Great Alligator) Alice Brandt
1980  Up the Academy Bliss
1981  Caveman Lana
 The Unseen Jennifer Fast
1982 The Cooler  
1983  Princess Daisy Vanessa Valerian
1984  Give My Regards to Broad Street Journalist
1986  To the North of Katmandu  

Text and table from Wikipedia


Filed under: Actresses, Article, Entertainment, Models & starlets, Movies, The seventies, The sixties Tagged: American actresses, Barbara Bach, Ringo Star

Sioux Chief Hollow Horn Bear

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In 1913, the Sioux chief Hollow Horn Bear led a delegation of Indians to the inauguration of President Woodrow Wilson. He caught pneumonia during the visit and died.

Washington, D.C., ca. 1913. "Hollow Horn Bear." Whose visage graced five-dollar bills and 14-cent postage stamps, and whose companion’s figure has been whittled down by Harris & Ewing’s re-touchers. 8×10 glass negative.

Image and text from Shorpy


Filed under: People, Photography Tagged: Indians, Red indians, Sioux, Sioux chiefs

Matadora Conchita Cintrón

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Matadora Conchita Cintrón, Arles, France, 1949 (Brassaï)

One of the world’s premier rejoneadores and the most-respected matadora in bullfighting history, Cintrón retired at the age of 27 after a legendary bullfight in Jaén, Spain.
In the final moments of this performance, she rode over to the presidente’s box and asked permission to break the Spanish law forbidding a woman from dismounting her horse and fighting the bull on foot. Her request was denied.
But instead of peacefully exiting the arena, Cintrón dismounted anyway and rushed the unsuspecting young male understudy assigned to kill her bull. She grabbed his sword and muleta (the small red cape used in the final act of a bullfight) and shocked the crowd by caping the bull and preparing it for the kill. She lined up the animal with the sword and then, in dramatic fashion, let the blade drop to the sand; the bull charged, whereupon Cintrón softly simulated the kill by touching the bull on the shoulders as it thundered by.
The audience erupted into cheers, throwing hats and red carnations at her feet. Cintrón walked calmly away from the bull and was arrested at ringside. With the audience on the verge of rioting in protest of her arrest, Cintrón was pardoned and released. It was one of the most dramatic moments in bullfighting history.
As Orson Welles, who wrote the introduction to Cintrón’s autobiography, Memoirs of a Bullfighter, concluded, the matadora’s career “ended in a single burst of glorious criminality. You can’t keep a lady waiting forever, and there came an afternoon when she decided that she’d waited long enough.”

Matadora Conchita Cintrón, Arles, France, 1949 (Brassaï)

One of the world’s premier rejoneadores and the most-respected matadora in bullfighting history, Cintrón retired at the age of 27 after a legendary bullfight in Jaén, Spain.

In the final moments of this performance, she rode over to the presidente’s box and asked permission to break the Spanish law forbidding a woman from dismounting her horse and fighting the bull on foot. Her request was denied.

But instead of peacefully exiting the arena, Cintrón dismounted anyway and rushed the unsuspecting young male understudy assigned to kill her bull. She grabbed his sword and muleta (the small red cape used in the final act of a bullfight) and shocked the crowd by caping the bull and preparing it for the kill. She lined up the animal with the sword and then, in dramatic fashion, let the blade drop to the sand; the bull charged, whereupon Cintrón softly simulated the kill by touching the bull on the shoulders as it thundered by.

The audience erupted into cheers, throwing hats and red carnations at her feet. Cintrón walked calmly away from the bull and was arrested at ringside. With the audience on the verge of rioting in protest of her arrest, Cintrón was pardoned and released. It was one of the most dramatic moments in bullfighting history.

As Orson Welles, who wrote the introduction to Cintrón’s autobiography,Memoirs of a Bullfighter, concluded, the matadora’s career “ended in a single burst of glorious criminality. You can’t keep a lady waiting forever, and there came an afternoon when she decided that she’d waited long enough.”

Image and text found on …like a girl


Filed under: People, Photography Tagged: Female bullfighters, Matadora Conchita Cintrón

Holy Crap….

This Week’s Girliemag Article – Truth Seeker

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heading_thumb14_thumbA digital recreation of an article published in
Adam Magazine Vol10 No10 – Feb 1966

ill_002_thumb1_thumb[132]“No matter what I’m doing," says Christine Reid, lovely and successful operatic singer, actress and television commercial model, "I demand honesty,

truth. If a man likes me, I expect him to say so- if he doesn’t, I want that said as well." Which isn’t a very likely happening. As a matter of fact, when Christine played the lead in a stage rendition of "A Streetcar Named Desire," she received a standing ovation and nobody, to date, has said that he didn’t like her.

Read the whole article and see
the naughty pictures
HERE

Warning: Nudity do occur in this article. If you are under age or live in a country where watching images of nude women for some reason  are against the law  I take no responsibility if you click the link above. In other words you’re flying solo from here on – Ted ;-)

Related articles


Filed under: Article, Models & starlets, Nudes Tagged: Adam Magazine, Girliemagazines

J C Leyendecker On Coffee

The Sunday Comic – The Sweater

Round The World By Steam – 1915 Rotterdamsche Lloyd

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The Stoomvaart Maatschappij Nederland (SMN), otherwise known as the Netherland Line, was founded in Amsterdam in 1870, while the Koninklijke Rotterdamsche Lloyd (KRL) was founded in Rotterdam in 1875. In a long-lasting friendly rivalry, both shipping companies offered regular mail ship services between the Netherlands and the Dutch East Indies, the Dutch overseas colony in South East Asia now known as Indonesia.

Within the Dutch East Indies, inter-island services were provided by the Koninklijke Paketvaart-Maatschappij (KPM), founded in Amsterdam in 1888 and with the operational head office in Batavia, now known as Jakarta.

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These shipping services to the Dutch East Indies were complemented by the Koninklijke Java-China Paketvaart Lijnen (KJCPL), also called the "Royal Interocean Lines", founded in Amsterdam in 1902 and with the operational head office at what is now Java Road in Hong Kong.

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To ensure independence and to provide protection against involuntary take-overs by competitors, SMN, KRL and KPM formed an alliance under the name NV Nederlandsche Scheepvaart Unie in 1908, which also meant that the individual shipping companies were restricted to their agreed trading areas. This practice is known as a cartel. Highlights of the pre-war developments were the introduction of passenger mail services sailing alternating from Amsterdam and Rotterdam via Suez and the Red Sea to Batavia, in addition to the regular freight services. The inter-island service with connections to Hong Kong was provided by the KPM and KJCPL with passenger-mail vessels Boussevain, Tegelberg, and Nieuw Holland. Passenger vessels managed by KRL and SMN were: Oranje, Johan van Oldenbarneveld,Indrapoera, Christiaan Huygens, Nieuw Holland, Marnix van St. Aldegonde, and Johan de Wit. The well-known Willem Ruys was still under construction at the beginning of World War II at the shipyard in Vlissingen / Flushing and was flooded in the shipyard till 1945.

Ship on poster

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1915_rotterdamsche lloyd_03SS Insulinde (1914-1933) PCLG

Built: 1914 at the Schelde.Vlissingen.
Keel laying: 26-10-1912 Launching: 01-11-1913
Completion date: 21-03-1914 Seatrial: 15-03-1914
Building number: 150
Tonnage: 9615
Dimensions: 146.34 x 17.42 x 5.10.
Machine: T E 3 cyl 7000 hp Scheldt [15].

Further details:

Pass 120 1kl.109 2kl.40 3kl.40 4kl.Na 1928 the three kl expanded with 83 pass.

From 1916 to 1918 imposed located in Rotterdam because of war conditions

1933 ss Banfora Cie Generale de Navigation A Vapeur.Frankrijk.
1957 ss Banfora MARU Japanese destroyers.

25-08-1957 arrival in Yokohama for demolition,
00-09-1957 demolished at Amakasu Sangyo Kisen KK Oasaka.


Filed under: Advertising, Holidays, Maritime history, Posters, Transportation, Traveling Tagged: Rotterdamsche Lloyd, SS Insulinde, Steam ship posters

London Anno 1959 – Part 11

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THE VICTORIA MEMORIAL – The Memorial stands in front of Buckingham Palace, as may be seen in the next part. Here the north-west side is shown, with the Mall running to the left and in the background Victoria Tower and the towers of Westminster Abbey. The designer of the Memorial was Sir Aston Webb, while the sculptor was Sir Thomas Brock, who was also responsible for the Captain Cook statue by the Admiralty Arch. The topmost figure in gilded bronze represents Victory, with Courage and Constancy at her feet. The Queen in state robes is seated facing the Mall (the orb in her left hand can just be seen) and round the pedestal are marble groups typifying Justice, Motherhood and Truth. At the four corners, below the sculptured groups, are ships’ prows also in marble. At the unveiling ceremony Thomas Brock, the sculptor, was knighted.

From “Country Life Picture Book of London” with photos by G F Allen


Filed under: Art, British Tagged: 1959, Country Life, G F Allen, London, Thomas Brock, Victoria Memorial

Doronina Tatiana – Kazakhstani Commercial Artist

This Week’s Softdrink – Maaza

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Maaza
(Hindi: माज़ा, Bengali: মাজ়া) is a Coca-Cola fruit drink brand marketed in Middle East, Africa, Eastern Europe and Asia, the most popular drink being the mango variety, so much that over the years, the Maaza brand has become a104651_maaza_01synonymous with Mango. Initially Coca-Cola had also launched Maaza in orange and pineapple variants, but these variants were subsequently dropped. Coca-Cola has recently re-launched these variants again in the Indian market.

Mango drinks currently account for 90% of the fruit juice market in India. Maaza currently dominates the fruit drink category and competes with Pepsi’s Slice brand of mango drink and Frooti, manufactured by Parle Agro.

a104651_maaza_06While Frooti was sold in small cartons, Maaza and Slice were initially sold in returnable bottles. However, all brands are also now available in small cartons and large PET bottles. Of late, the Indian market is witnessing the entry of a large number of small manufacturers producing only mango fruit drink.

Maaza has a distinct pulpy taste as compared to Frooti and tastes slightly sweeter than Slice. Maaza claims to contain mango pulp of the Alphonso variety, which is known as the "King of Mangoes" in India.

History

The Union Beverages Factory, based in the UAE, began selling Maaza as a franchisee in the Middle East and Africa in 1976. By 1995, it had acquired rights to the Maaza brand in these countries through Maaza International Co LLC Dubai. Maaza was launched in 1976 in India. and in India, Maaza was acquired by Coca-Cola India in 1993 from Parle-Bisleri along a104651_maaza_07with other brands such as Limca, Citra, Thums Up and Gold Spot. Maaza was acquired by House of Spices in 2005 for the North American market. Finally in the year 2006 Infra Foodbrands acquired Maaza for the European, Caribbean and West-African market and cooperates with House of Spices for the North American market.

Infra Foodbrands

Since 1998 Infra Foodbrands, located in The Netherlands, has started distribution in Europe, West-Africa, North America, Canada and the Caribbean, using frequent worldwide connections from Rotterdam Main Port. Since 2006 Infra Foodbrands is the owner of the Maaza brand and exports to 33 countries (and expanding) worldwide.

a104651_maaza_05Infra Foodbrands develops, designs, distributes and markets a range of beverages, all supported by marketing- and promotional support programmes. Until the appointment of Infra Foodbrands BV, as its European franchise, Maaza was a one-product brand (Maaza Mango) with limited appeal to ethnic consumers in geographical pockets. Since then Infra Foodbrands has turned Maaza into a recognised beverage brand, offering Maaza in 10 different flavours (f.e. Mango, Tropical, Guava, Lychee, Passion Fruit/Maracuja, Pineapple, Banana, Papaya, Fruit Punch and Guanabana) in 9 different packaging formats (f.e. PET bottles, cartons, glass bottles and cans) suitable for all segments of the market. The Maaza drinks are distributed to supermarkets, convenience stores, hotels, cafes and many other outlets.

Text from Wikipedia 


Help Needed
I need your help visitors, both in suggesting sodas and soft drinks from around the world and in giving your opinion on the ones presented if you know the product. And you can start with giving your opinion on the ones posted already or reading what other visitors have written  – Ted

List of Soft drinks and sodas posted already
Visitors soft drinks and sodas suggestions and comments


Filed under: Advertising, Food & drinks, Soft drinks and sodas Tagged: Coca Cola, Maaza

Norsjö Shopper & Norsjö Partner

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Norsjö Shopper and Norsjö Partner, also called Forshaga Shopper, was a three-wheeled covered scooter manufactured by Norsjö Mechanical Workshop Ltd in Sweden between 1961 and 1994.

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The Partner model came in 1961 and the vehicle was from the beginning called a "shopper". When it was updated in 1964 it also got the model name “Shopper”. The vehicle was marketed in 1964 as "shopping car for the housewife". The moped had a pipe frame construction dressed with plate and cover made ​​of a104652_shopper_02glass fibre reinforced plastic.  The moped was designed by Technology for everyone cartoonist Carl Eric Jöranson. The mopeds had dispensation from driver licenses and and with a stronger engine, 1.5 horsepower later with an exemption so they could be driven without a helmet.

According to the Swedish Traffic Authorities the exemption from helmet use was only valid if the moped was fitted with approved seat belt!

Ta104652_shopper_07he engine of the first years model was a fan-cooled 1 horsepower Husqvarna with manual gearbox and foot operated clutch and a mechanical gearshift. Some models with Husqvarna Engines was started from the seat with a hand lever, others with drawstring much like a lawn mower / brush cutter. The vehicle had three wheels and had disc brakes on all three 8-inch wheels. The weight was 74 kg.

The vehicle door was controlled by a handle mounted in the fiberglass hood which folds up when the driver was getting in and out of the vehicle.

The Husqvarna engines of 1.5 hp was eventually replaced by a Sachs Engines with automatic transmission was name Saxonette. They had a hand-operated lever that you could pull and push the moped till the engine fired and thus could still drive off  if the pull cord broke or if the engine was hard to start. This worked even on engines with an electric starter.

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Eventually there was fitted an electric start option and the moped got a starting battery and an electrical 12 volts system instead of 6 volt, that was common on other mopeds.

1964 the cost of a new shopper was SEK 2,000 and 1988 cost the approximately SEK 24,000.

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Filed under: Retro technology, Scandinavian, The seventies, The sixties, Transportation, Traveling Tagged: Mopeds, Norsjö Partner, Norsjö Shopper

Retro Sound Systems

The Bobby Soxers

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a104654_bobby soxers_03Bobby soxer
is a 1940s sociological coinage describing the often very zealous fans of traditional pop music, in particular its creators like singer Frank Sinatra.  Bobby soxers were usually teenage girls and young adult women from about 12 to 25. Fashionable adolescent girls wore poodle skirts and rolled down their socks to the ankle. In high schools and colleges, the gymnasium was often used as a dance floor; however, since street shoes and street detritus might damage the polished wood floors, the students were required to remove their shoes and dance in their bobby socks, hence the phrase ‘sock hop‘.

Adopting (in her teenage years) an impressionable adolescent persona, former child actress Shirley Temple portrayed the type in the film The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer (1947).

Text from Wikipedia 

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Filed under: Facts, People, Photography Tagged: Bobby-soxers, Frank Sinatra, sock hops

Learn To Read Them There Legs Guys

Bardot & Loren At 75: Two Screen Goddesses; Two Ways To Grow Old

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The French sex symbol announced her retirement just before she turned 40 and devoted her life to animal welfare; the sultry Italian star posed for a Pirelli calendar only three years ago and is still making movies. Elizabeth Day says they both deserve respect

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Loren posting for the Pirelli calendar and Bardot on the way to meet Sarkozy

When Sophia Loren turned 72 three years ago, she celebrated by posing semi-naked for a Pirelli calendar alongside a handful of women less than half her age. Wearing a silk negligée, she draped herself languorously under a bed sheet with her head tilted sensually upwards in a suggestion of ecstatic abandon. A Vatican aide was moved to comment that, if the Pope ever changed his stance on human cloning, it would be because of Loren.

In the same year, Brigitte Bardot was photographed on her way to a meeting with Nicolas Sarkozy, then French interior minister, to discuss cruelty against Canadian seals. Bardot was dressed in black and limping on crutches because of a nagging hip complaint. According to one mid-market tabloid, her appearance was marked by "sagging jowls covered in heavy make-up and a wiry, unkempt patch of greying hair".

The comparison might seem ungracious, but Bardot has the misfortune of being almost exactly the same age as her fellow actress: this month they will both turn 75 within days of each other. These two cinematic legends of the 1960s have chosen to age in very different ways, provoking very different public reactions. Their forthcoming birthdays prompt the inevitable question: how should an icon best grow old?


My thoughts on Loren young or old is well known on this blog ;-) and so are my thoughts on the young Bardot. And Bardot has my respect for her work for animal rights, but she has also grown into a hard headed fascist and that deserves no one’s respect – Ted


Filed under: Actresses, Article Tagged: Brigitte Bardot, Elizabeth Day, Growing old, Sophia Loren, The Observer