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This Week’s Favourite Female Singer – Dolores Keane

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780_dolores keane_01Dolores Keane (born 26 September 1953) is an Irish folk singer and occasional actress. She was a founding member of the successful group De Dannan, and has since embarked on a very successful solo career, establishing herself as one of the most loved interpreters of Irish song.

Background

Keane was born in a small village called Sylane (near Tuam) in rural County Galway in the west of Ireland. She was raised by her aunts Rita and Sarah Keane since the age of four, who are also well-known sean-nós singers. Keane started her singing at a very young age, due to the influence of her musical aunts. She made her first recording for Radio Éireann in 1958, at the age of five. This early start inevitably meant that Keane would have a career in music. Her brother, Seán, also went on to enjoy a successful music career.

Musical career

De Dannan

In 1975, she co-founded the traditional Irish band De Dannan, and they released their debut album Dé Danann in that same year. The group gained international recognition and enjoyed major success in the late 1970s in the US. Keane went touring with the band and their single “The Rambling Irishman” was a big hit in Ireland. In early 1976, after a short two year spell, Keane left De Dannan and was replaced by Andy Irvine, who recorded live with the band on 30 April 1976, during the 3rd Irish Folk Festival in Germany. Soon thereafter, she married multi-instrumentalist John Faulkner, with whom she would subsequently record three albums of folk music (see next section).

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Solo career

The newly married Dolores and John decided to move to Britain. While there, the pair worked on a series of film scores and programmes for the BBC and formed two successful bands, The Reel Union and Kinvara. During this period Keane recorded her first solo album, There Was a Maid in 1978. This was followed by two other releases, Broken Hearted I’ll Wander (1979) and Farewell 780_dolores keane_04to Eirinn (1980), which gave credit to Faulkner. She returned to Ireland in the mid-1980s and rejoined withDe Dannan and recorded the albums Anthem and Ballroom with them.

Keane turned her attention, once again, to her solo career in 1988. It saw the release of the eponymous Dolores Keane album. Her follow-up album A Lion in a Cage, which hit the shelves in 1989, featured a song written by Faulkner called Lion in a Cage protesting the imprisonment of Nelson Mandela.[3] It served as Keane’s second Irish number one and she performed the hit at the celebration of his release. This exposure expanded Keane’s reputation and popularity worldwide. A new facet was added to Dolores’ career when she played the female lead in the Dublin production of Brendan Behan‘s The Hostage, a new translation by Niall Tóibín and Michael Scott, the opening night of which was attended by Mary Robinson, the President of Ireland at the time.

In 1992, Keane was among the many female Irish singers to lend their music to the record-smashing anthology A Woman’s Heart. The album, which also featured Eleanor McEvoy, Mary Black, Frances Black, Sharon Shannon and Maura O’Connell, went on to become the biggest-selling album in Irish history. A Woman’s Heart Vol.2 was released in late 1994 and emulated its predecessor in album charts the world over. Also in 1994, a solo album, entitled Solid Ground, was released on the Shanachie label (available on Dara Records) and received critical acclaim in Europe and America.

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In August, 1995, Keane was awarded the prestigious Fiddler’s Green Hall of Fame award in Rostrevor, County Down, for her “significant contribution to the cause of Irish music and culture”. In that same year, she took to the stage in the Dublin production of JM Synge’s Playboy of the Western World. Dolores contributed to the RTÉ/BBC television production "Bringing It All Back Home", a series of programmes illustrating the movement of Irish music to America. Dolores was shown performing both in Nashville, Tennessee with musicians such as Emmylou Harris and Richard Thompson and at home in Galway with her aunts Rita and Sarah.

In August, 1997, Keane went to number one again in the Irish album charts 780_dolores keane_05with a compilation album with her most loved songs. And another studio album was released by Keane in 1998, called Night Owl. It saw Keane returning to her traditional Irish roots and it did well in Europe and America. Despite a healthy solo career, Keane went on tour with De Dannan again in the late 1990s, where she played to packed audiences in venues such as Birmingham, Alabama and New York City.

Keane has not released a solo album since 1998 as of 2008, stating that she wanted to take a hard-earned break after twenty-five years of relentless touring.

Musical legacy

Keane is known the world-over for her deep, yet melodic voice. Her recordings of songs such as Dougie McLean‘s "Caledonia", Frank A. Fahey’s "Galway Bay", Paul Brady‘s "The Island" and "Never Be the Sun" are regarded as amongst the greatest interpretations of these songs. American singer Nanci Griffith said of Keane: "Dolores Keane, the queen of the soul of Ireland, has a sacred voice".

Text from Wikipedia 

780_dolores keane_06 Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Calodonia 
Dolores Keane
 
The Best Of Dolores Keane – 13 Classic Songs
1999
1999
Celtic/Irish
780_dolores keane_06 Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Galway Bay
Dolores Keane
 
The Best Of Dolores Keane – 13 Classic Songs
1999
1999
Celtic/Irish
780_dolores keane_06 Title:
Artist:
Recording:
Recorded:
Released:
Genre:
Teddy O’Neill
Dolores Keane
  
The Best Of Dolores Keane – 13 Classic Songs 
1999
1999 
Celtic/Irish 

Filed under: Article, Folkrock, Music Tagged: De Dannan, Dolores Keane, Irish folksingers

The Lonely Hearts Killers

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763_lonely hearts_02"I’m no average killer!" Raymond Martinez Fernandez told Michigan cops on the day he was arrested. The slim, smartly dressed, balding man sat in the wooden chair between two detectives as he told a tawdry story of sex, lies and murder. He wiped his sweating forehead every few minutes with a white handkerchief supplied by his co-conspirator and obese sex slave, who looked on with wide-eyed admiration and love. For several hours he described their journey through a maze of deception and betrayal that ended with the deaths of as many as 17 women. "I have a way with women, a power over them," he said. That power, he claimed, was achieved by the practice of voodoo.

Raymond Martinez Fernandez, 34, was born in Hawaii of Spanish parents. His rotund girlfriend, Martha Jule Beck, 29, who weighed well over 200 pounds, lovingly brushed his thinning hair back on his head as he told police how they killed their last victims in the town of Byron Center, Michigan on the night of February 28, 1949. Later, when the victim’s two-year-old daughter refused to stop crying over the loss of her mother, Martha drowned her in a tub of dirty water while Raymond looked on. After the murders, they decided to go to the movies where they munched on popcorn and drank a gallon of soda.

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The day-by-day revelations about this bizarre couple had New York City’s press working overtime to keep up with the story that seemed too sleazy even by tabloid standards. Martha’s enormous size was the subject of never-ending speculation by the press who estimated her weight to be anywhere from 200 to over 300 pounds. This constant ridicule caused Martha to write a series of tearful, angry letters from prison to the media complaining of the unfair treatment she received from columnists like Walter Winchell and newspapers like The Daily News and the New York Mirror.

"I’m still a human, feeling every blow inside, even though I have the ability to hide my feelings and laugh," she said, "But that doesn’t say my heart isn’t breaking from the insults and humiliation of being talked about as I am. O yes, I wear a cloak of laughter."

Raymond Fernandez and Martha Beck

Fernandez and Beck came to be known as the "lonely hearts killers" in the nation’s press. Their murder trial took place during the scorching hot summer of 1949 in Bronx Criminal Court where the salacious testimony of "abnormal sexual practices" caused a near riot among spectators. The Latino Lothario and the plump, love-sick girlfriend who killed lonely, sex-starved women was a story weirder and more intriguing than anything out of the trashiest pulp magazines of the 1940s.

Read more here


Filed under: Article, People, The forties Tagged: Martha Jule Beck, Raymond Martinez Fernandez, The Lonely Hearts Killers

Excelsior Monarch MkII 1960-62

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After twelve months of development and ‘anything up to £20,000 costs’ the new Excelsior scooter was announced in June 1960 for production on the 1st July. The scooter was called the Monarch MKII and as the Scooter and Three Wheeler magazine stated ‘It’s all by Excelsior this time’ and ‘Glass Fibre for a new British Scooter’ The frame consisted of a 2¼” single tube backbone with three channel cross members supporting the floor.

The wheels were 10” diameter and quickly detachable – a well needed improvement over the rear wheel on the old Monarch. The engine was the same 147cc Excelsior unit with the Albion three speed gearbox operated by heel and toe pedals.

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The new scooter had a complete glass-fibre bodywork consisting of six sections, the rear body as one unit, two sections for the footboards, two mouldings formed the front apron with a separate moulding for the front mudguard.


Filed under: Facts, Motorcycles, The sixties Tagged: Excelsior Monarch MkII, Scooters

Grand-daddy’s Sauce – Part 41

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All posts material: “Sauce” and “Gentleman’s Relish” by Ronnie Barker – Hodder & Stoughton in 1977

The Difference

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The Lady: What is the difference between the burgundy at 5s. 6d.
and the one at 6s. 6d?
The waiter: One shilling, Madam.

Filed under: Humour, Illustration, Vintage Tagged: Burgundy, Waiters

The Lure Of The Mad Men – Part 18

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“Muscles are the new thin” is the new slogan around Europe these days and young women hit the training centres every day and eat so healthy that it becomes unhealthy. back in the days when the Mad Men cooked up the ad above the ideals were quite different. Young women were supposed to have forms, both here and there actually.

The add is terrible, particularly the drawings numbered 1,2 and 3, but there is a grain of truth in it some how. Most men prefer woman with forms. But does that justify making thin women feel bad about themselves. look at how the artist has made the thin woman’s face ugly and how she looks when she has gained a bit of weight. And do you think this is accidental. Get off it, it’s an ad for something that makes you gain weight – Ted


Filed under: Advertising, Advertisments, People, Retro, Retro advertising Tagged: Gaining weight, Ironized yeast, Mad Men

My Guitars Are Definitely Going To The Salvation Army

Catch-22 Babe Susanne Benton

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778_benton_00Susanne Benton (born February 3, 1948) is an American actress known for her film roles as General Dreedle’s WAC in Catch-22 (1970) and Quilla June Holmes in A Boy and His Dog (1975). During her early roles she refused to disrobe for her parts, despite the requests of her Universal Studios bosses. She appeared topless in Playboy in the May 1970 issue. In 1972, she appeared in the Andy Griffith film The Strangers in 7A, credited under her birth name, Susanne Hildur. She also used that alias when appearing in Barnaby Jones a year later.

She became convinced at the age of six that she would become a major star. She also believed that she would die before she reached her 28th birthday. She married James A Benton in 1966.

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Selected filmography

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Text from Wikipedia


Filed under: Article, Models & starlets, Nudes, Pinups, The seventies Tagged: American actresses, Catch-22, Susanne Benton

The Sunday Comic – A Reasonable Question

This Week’s Girliemag Article – Slim & Trim

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ill_002Most of the older-type westerns that are seen on the last, late show usually have the cliché in them that goes like this: pretty girl alights from stage coach, local cowpoke slides up to her and asks "Howdy Ma’am. Are you the new school marm?” This naturally leads to one thing and another, not always a plot, but what do you want for practically nothing? 

Read the whole article and see
the naughty pictures HERE

Warning: Nudity do occur in this article. If you are under age or live in a country where watching images of nude women for some reason  is against the law  I take no responsibility if you click the link above. In other words you’re flying solo from here on – Ted ;-)

 


Filed under: Article, Glamour, Models & starlets, Nudes, The sixties Tagged: 1963, Baby Doll magazine, Glamour photography

1959 PTV 250

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Built in Manresa, near Barcelona, by Automoviles Utilitarios S. A., the pretty little PTV (named after company owners Perramon, Tacho and Vila) was the second-biggest-selling microcar in Spain, next to Biscuter. While the latter was strictly a primitive, utilitarian device, the PTV was- with its proper doors, 2-tone paint, chrome trim and 12-inch wheels- intended for a more upscale, discerning clientele.

After a lengthy 2-year development period, the prototype appeared in 1956, featuring an in-house 250cc motor with aluminum piston and head, which drove the rear wheels. Independent front suspension, large diameter wheels and snug, enclosed bodywork even allowed discussion of driving comfort- a subject not remotely considered by a Biscuter driver.

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The car was improved over the years with the addition of bumpers and other extras. A 350cc motor was planned for later cars but was never actually put into production.

Inevitably, the end came from competition with a "real" car- the Fiat 600, license-built in Spain as the SEAT 600. This mass-produced, not-much-more-expensive car, had four cylinders and four seats, and simply steamrollered over the hand built PTV- a scene repeated all over Europe in the late 1950′s.

AUSA is still with us today, producing utility equipment and forklift trucks.

Text from Bruce Weiner Microcar Museum


Filed under: Automobiles, The fifties, Transportation, Traveling Tagged: 1959 PTV 250, Micro cars, mini cars, Spanish cars

Painting of a Mystery Man Was Hidden Under Picasso’s "The Blue Room"

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Curators have been studying Picasso’s "The Blue Room"—one of the highlights of the artist’s early 20th-century "blue period" —since 2008, and they’ve discovered it was painted over another work: a portrait of an unidentified man.

"The Blue Room" depicts a woman posing in Picasso’s Paris studio, but underneath is a study of a mustachioed man in a bowtie. Researchers at Washington D.C.’s Phillips Collection revealed the hidden image with a combination of X-ray and infrared analysis.

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"It’s really one of those moments that really makes what you do special," Phillips conservator Patricia Favero told the AP. "The second reaction was, ‘Well, who is it?’ We’re still working on answering that question."

Picasso reused many canvases early in his career, when he didn’t always have the means to afford fresh ones. His paintings "La Vie" and "Woman Ironing" were both previously discovered to have been painted over other pieces.

Text: NPR, Photos: AP Images


Filed under: Art, Paintings Tagged: e Blue Room, Overpainted canvasses, Painting of a Mystery Man, Picasso

Round The World By Steam – 1893 “Hamburg-Amerikanische Packetfahrt AG”

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1893_Hamburg Amerikanische Packetfahrt

The Hamburg Amerikanische Paketfahrt Aktien-Gesellschaft (HAPAG for short, often referred to in English as Hamburg America Line (sometimes also Hamburg-American Line, Hamburg-Amerika Linie or Hamburg Line); literally Hamburg American Packet-shipping Joint-stock company) was a transatlantic 1893_Hamburg Amerikanische Packetfahrt_ill01shipping enterprise established in Hamburg, Germany, in 1847. Among the founders were prominent citizens such as Albert Ballin (Director General), Adolph Godeffroy, Ferdinand Laeisz, Carl Woermann, August Bolten and others, and its main financial backers were Berenberg Bank and H. J. Merck & Co. It soon developed into the largest German, and at times the world’s largest, shipping company, serving the market created by the German immigration to the United States and later immigration from Eastern Europe. On September 1, 1970, after 123 years of independent existence, HAPAG merged with the Bremen-based North German Lloyd to form Hapag-Lloyd AG.

Ports served

In the early years, the Hamburg America Line exclusively connected European ports with North American ports, such as Hoboken, New Jersey, or New Orleans, Louisiana. With time, however, the company established lines to all continents.

Notable journeys

In 1858, its liner Austria sank, killing 449 people. In 1891, the cruise of the Augusta Victoria in the Mediterranean and the Near East from 22 January to 22 March, with 241 passengers including Albert Ballin and wife, is often stated to have been the first passenger cruise. Christian Wilhelm Allers published an 1893_Hamburg Amerikanische Packetfahrt_ill02illustrated account of it as "Bakschisch". In 1900, 1901 and 1903 its liner Deutschland won the Blue Riband taking the prize from the Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse. In 1906 Prinzessin Victoria Luiseran aground off the coast of Jamaica. No lives were lost by the grounding; however, the ship’s captain committed suicide after getting all the passengers safely off the ship. In 1912, its liner SS Amerika was the first ship to warn Titanic of icebergs.

HAPAG’s leader Albert Ballin, believed that safety, size, comfort and luxury would always win out over speed. Thus he conceived the three largest liners yet to be built, named the Imperator, Vaterland and Bismarck. The first two were briefly in service before the First World War. In 1914, the Vaterland was caught in port at Hoboken, New Jersey at the outbreak of World War I and interned by the United States. She was seized, renamed Leviathan after the declaration of war on Germany in 1917, and served for the duration and beyond as a troopship. After the war, she was retained by the Americans for war reparations. In 1919 Vaterland’s sister ships —Imperator and the unfinished Bismarck—were handed over to the allies as war reparations to Britain and sold to Cunard Line and White Star Line, respectively, and renamed Berengaria and Majestic. In 1917, its liner Allemannia was "torpedoed by German submarine near Alicante"; 2 people were lost.  In 1939, its liner St. Louis was unable to find a port in Cuba, the United States, or Canada willing to accept the more than 950 Jewish refugees on board and had to return to Europe.

1893_Hamburg Amerikanische Packetfahrt_ill03 
A postcard of the view from the water of the Hamburg-American Steamship Lines docks in Hoboken, New Jersey, in about 1910.

Ship on the poster

SS Fürst Bismarck was an ocean liner built in 1890 by AG Vulcan for the Hamburg America Line. A steamship of 8,430 gross register tons, it was assigned to transatlantic crossings between Hamburg Germany and00 New York, USA. Fürst Bismarck and the sister ships were part of an express fleet that usually made the trip in five to six days.

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Design

The SS Fürst Bismarck was designed with five decks constructed of steel and teak. The three funnels rose above the hurricane deck. The ship also had two masts, but without yards. Each side of the ship was subdivided into numerous watertight compartments. The hull of the ship had a double bottom, the space between divided into chambers, which could be filled with water or emptied by means of automatic pumps, thus increasing or decreasing the draught at will, and guarding the ship from grounding. The enormous engines [were] of 6000 to 8000 horsepower each. The screws are of manganese bronze, with three or four blades.

First class deck state rooms, located mid-ship, were 7 to 9 feet in width, with elaborate furnishings. Separate saloons for men and women allowed for privacy, smoking (gentlemen only), and conversation. The Second class rooms were on the same level as first class, but with most rooms located fore and aft, 1893_Hamburg Amerikanische Packetfahrt_ill07with smaller rooms and their own saloons. The steerage was directly below the Second Cabin; separate compartments housed single men, women, and families.

Service

Launched on November 29, 1890, the ship made its maiden run from Hamburg to New York, via Southampton (England), on May 8, 1891. In the service of Hamburg America line (HAPAG) on September 27, 1894, 5 days, 18 hours, 10 minutes, with Captain Adolph Albers (1843–1902) at the helm. Albers, later Commodore of the Hamburg America fleet, held several speed records for trans Atlantic crossings before his death at the helm of the SS Deutschland in 1902. Between its maiden journey and 1894, the ship made 140 crossings, predominantly as an immigrant ship, and carrying American travelers to Europe on the return journey. On July 4, 1894, in honor of its many crossings and "in memory of Muhlenberg, Herkimer, Steuben and Dekalb," the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Columbia Liberty Bell Company presented the ship, and its Captain, with a replica of the Liberty Bell, requesting that the ship’s captain ordered it to be rung when the ship came in sight of the Navesink Highlands (by day) or Navesink Twin Lights (by night). After 1894, it was occasionally in use as a luxury cruise ship. HAPAG commissioned a second SS Fürst Bismarck (1905) in 1905.

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In 1904, the ship became the auxiliary cruiser the Don in the Russian Navy. In 1906, she was assigned to the Russian Volunteer Fleet with the name Moskva. In 1913, she became a depot ship in the Austrian Navy, the "Gaea." The vessel was seized by Italy during the First World War, rebuilt, and renamed San Guisto. She was scrapped in Italy in 1924.


Filed under: Article, Ephemera, Maritime history, Posters, Transportation, Traveling Tagged: Hamburg America Line, Hamburg-Amerikanische Packetfahrt AG, Steamship posters

Switzerland

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From the 33rd edition of “XXth Century Health And Pleasure Resorts Of Europe” published in 1933

bok_front_small_thumb[1]_thumbROUGH CLASSIFICATION OF SOME OF THE MOST POPULAR SWISS RESORTS

SUMMER MOUNTAIN RESORTS: (For those opening in Winter, see Winter Sports Resorts) :Adelboden, Airolo, Anderrn rtt Arolla, Arosa Arveyes, Axenfels, Ballaigues, Beatenberg, Berisal, Binn, Bricolla, Btirgenstock, Caux, Celerina, Charnper y, Champex, Chateau-d’Oex, Chesieres, Col des Plariches, Centers, Corbeyrier, Crans-sur-Sierre, Davos, Diablerets, Eggishom, Engelberg, Etivaz (Bains d’), Evolena, Fafleralp, Ferpecle, Fiesch, Finhaut, Forclaz, Frutigen, Gletsch, Griesalp, Grimentz, Grindelwald, Gruben-Meiden, Gryon, Gstaad, Guttannen, Gsteig, Innertkirchen, Interlaken, Kandersteg, Klosters, Lauterbrunnen, La Fouly, La Sage, Lenk, Lenzerheide, Les Hauderes, Les Plans s. Bex, Les Rasses, Le Sepey, Leysin (climatic), Maloja, Mayens de Sion, Meiringen, Montana, Muhlen, Monte Generoso, Morschach, Murren, Oeschenen-See, Pontresina, Reuti, Riederalp, Riederfurka, Riffelalp, Rossinieres, Saanen, Saanenrnoser, Saas-Fee , Saas-Grund, Sarnaden, San Bernardino, Savognino, Scheidegg, Seelisberg, Simplon-Kulm, Spliigen, Ste-Croix, St-Mcritz, Taes’ch, Tiefenkastel, Val Ferret, Val d’Illiez, Villars, Weiss horn, Wengen, Wengernalp, Wiesen, Zermatt, Zernez, Zuoz.

RESORTS on or near the following LAKES: Lake of Geneva (Lac Leman), see Caux, Chexbres, Coppet, Evian-Ies-Bains (France), Geneva, Lausanne- Ouchy, Montreux with Clarens and Territet, Nyon, St. Cergue, Vevey, Villeneuve. Lake Lucerne, see Axenfels, Brunnen, Burgenstock, Lucerne, Morschach, Lake Lugano , see Lugano, Cademario, Monte Generoso, Monte Salvatore, Sonvico. Lake Maggiore, see Locarno, Ascona …. and Section ITALY. Lakes of Neuchatel and Bienne, see Neuchatel, Bienne, Cressier, Neuveville, St. Blaise, Yverdon. Lakes of Thoune and Brienz, see Interlaken, Beatenberg, Gunten, Hilterfingen, Oberhofen, Spiez, Thoune. Lake of Zurich, see Zurich. Mountain Lakes, see Arosa, Champex, Crans, Davos, Fafleralp, Le Prese, Klosters, Maloja, Montana, Piora, San Bernardino, St. Moritz.

SPRING, AUTUMN and MID-CLIMATIC RESORTS: PRACTICALLY ALL THE LOWER LAKE DISTRICTS (see above), as well as such places as Ballaigues, Bex-les-Bains, Henniez (Bains d’), Le Prese, Meiringen, Ragaz, Sierre and some of the lower mountain resorts. (For the dates of opening of the latter, see individual insertions.)

WINTER SPORT RESORTS: Adelboden, Andermatt, Arosa, Arveyes, Baltatgues , Beatenberg, Caux, Celerina, Champery, Champex, Chateau-d ‘Oex, Ohesteres , Crans-sur-Sierre, Davos, Diablerets, Engelberg, Grindelwald, Gryon, Griesalp, Gstaad, Gsteig, Jaunpass, Julier Route, Jungfraujoch, Kandersteg, Klosrers ;’ Lenk , Lenzerheide, Le Sepey, Les Rasses, Leysin, Maloja, Montana, Montreux (by mountain railways), Murren, Pontresina, Reuti, Roasinieres , Saanen, Saanenmoser, Samaden, San Bernardino, Splugen , Ste. Croix, St. MOritz, Surlej, Vevey (by mountain railways), Villars, Wengen, Wiesen, Zermatt, Zuoz. – Summer ski-ing on the Jungfraujoch.


SWITZERLAND FOR THE FOREIGN VISITOR

Switzerland, the" Inexhaustible ". is no longer looked upon as a mere tourist district. the World is recognizing more and more the advantages of its health giving properties and educational facilities,

and, now that the League of Nations has" come to stay", it may even be regarded as the centre of International Politics.

The days when people had time to spare are past, and with them the days when EngIish families could afford to put in a few months (sometimes even a few years) of leisurely existence on the Continent , Money is more plentiful, but time scarcer now-a-days. This has affected the Swiss Tourist World to acertain extent though the main Summer mountain resorts and Winter Sport centres are still crowded during the height of their respective seasons. It is for this reason that from time to time some “mumbling and grumbling” regarding prices is heard. If only people would realize how comparatively cheaply they could live when the rush is over and what delightful accommodation would then be offered them for the same terms as a small room during the season, no one except those obliged to, would travel in the full season, excepting, of course in the more remote and less patronized places. Except for actual mountaineering, May and June, when the Alpine Flora is at its best, and Autumn with its glorious colouring, are preferable in any but the highest Mountain resorts. On the lakes and in the lower regions it is during these months that the meadows and orchards offer such a wonderful sight, whilst for Winter Sports, snow conditions from the middle of January to the end of February are usually at their best and the hours of sunshine longer.

From a TOURIST point of view, Switzerland consists of several distinct districts, which can be roughly classified as follows:

THE BERNESE OBERLAND Best reached from Berne via the Lake of Thoune, includes:

THE LAKE RESORTS of Thoune, Hllterflngen , Oberhofen, Gunten and Spiez, with Beatenberg above the Lake;

THE KANDER VALLEY (Berne-Loetschberg-Simplon Railway) leaving from Spiez to Kandersteg, in which lie the stations of Pruttgen (junction for the car service to Adelboden), Reichenbach (junction for Griesalp) ; . The famous excursion centre of Interlaken and the many beautiful Summer and Winter mountain resorts at the foot of the Jungfrau Group (Grindelwald, Lauterbrunnen, Murren, Scheldegg , Wengen, Wengernalp) ; The Jungfrau Railway, which carries passengers up to an altitude of 11,400 feet into a world of ice and snow, is unique; The Bernese Oberland extends beyond Lake Brienz to Melrfngen at the foot of the Grimsel, whence the railway continues via Brünig (junction for Hohfluh and Reuti) to Lucerne.

THE GRISONS (Canton of Graubünden), starting at Coire, the Capital, includes the famous high mountain resorts of Arosa, Davos , Klosters, Lenzerheide, Pontresfna , and the Engadine with. Samaden, St. Moritz and Maloja. Sunshine and snow conditions in these higher places can be relied upon m Winter, whilst in Summer the wonderfully bracing air and the sun on the high altItudes is unsurpassed in health-giving properties. The scenery with its white capped mountains, dark pine forests and turquoise blue lakes is beautiful in all parts. The Grisons extends, passing Maloja, towards the Italian Lake DistrIct ; passing the famous baths of Tarasp-Schuls to the Austrian Tyrol; by the Bernma Railway passing Pontresma and Le Prese to Italy, and via Zernez over the Ofen Pass (for Merano in the Alto-Adige). It includes the Albula Pass (by train or car) and the beautiful Car Routes over the Julier, Fluela, Splugen and San Bernardmo Passes.

THE JURA round about the Lakes of Neuchatel and Bienneincludes the Baths of Yverdon and the heights above, where several charming Summer and Winter resorts (Ste. Croix-Ies Rasses , etc.) are dotted amongst the beautiful forests. Ballalgues , being just above Vallorbe, is the nearest Swiss Summer and Winter resort to Paris and a delightful motoring centre. Neuchatel is charmingly situated on Its own Lake. Cressier and St. Blaise are within a short distance of Neuchatel ; Neuveville and Bienne (Biel) (a centre of the watchmaking industry) lie on the northern shore of the Lake of Bienne. Fribourg (Berne-Lausanne main line) and Morat (Murten) (Berne-Lausanne car route) are extremely picturesque and historically interesting old towns. Henniez-Ies-Bains (mineral springs) and Marnand are on the mam Berne-Lausanne car route.

THE LAKE OF GENEVA (Lac Leman) forms the frontier between France and Switzerland, extending from Villeneuve in the Rhone Valley to Geneva, with Montreux, Vevey, Lausanne, Nyon, Coppet, etc. on the Swiss side. Large, comfortable steamers link up all towns and villages on the Lake, whilst railways, trams, funiculars, and car services run from all places to the many beautiful resorts on the heights, famous in Spring for their Flora, in Autumn for the colouring of their wooded slopes, and several of them for Winter sports. This is the most" residential" district of Switzerland for foreigners, partly owing to Its mild climate, partly to its facilities for international travel, and greatly owning to its educational advantages.

GENEVA, now a great international centre, has many attractions. The neighbourhood includes Coppet, Divonne-Ies-Bains (France), Monnetier (France), Nyon, St. Cer gue , and the numerous charming resorts just over the frontier in Savoy.

THE LAKE OF LUCERNE (Vierwaldstattersee) extends from the famous tourist centre of Lucerne, (with Burgenstock and Sonnenberg on the heights above), between the Rigi, Pilatus and other mountains, towards the Briinig Pass; towards the well-known mountain resort of Engelberg, and, passing Seeliberg, Schoneck and other places on its slopes and shores, is rejoined at Brunnen by the Gotthard Railway which leaves it at Fluelen. Morschach and Axenfels lie just above Brunnen. This lake is considered by many to be the most beautiful of Swiss Lakes. In Spring and early Summer, when the orchards are in blossom, this can scarcely be disputed. The Autumn foliage is also very beautiful. -Comfortablesteamers, railway and car services link up all places.

THE PAYS D’ENHAUT lies between the picturesque old town of Gruyeres, the hills North of Lake Geneva and the Bernese Oberland, terminating at Zweisimmen, the junction for Lake Thoune and Lenk. It consists mainly of pasture land, wooded hills and rocky summits, interspersed with picturesque and prosperous villages, including the well-known Summer and Winter resorts of Cha teau-d ‘Oex, Rossfniere , Etivaz (Bains d ‘), a few miles from Cha teauvd”Dex or Le Sepey , Gstaad, Gsteig, Saanenand Saanenmoser and the Jaunpass with the picturesque village of Charmey. Beyond Zweisimrneri lie the Baths of Weissenburg, and at Oey-Diemtigen a road branches off to Grimmialp.

THE RHONE VALLEY, though the river has its source in the beautiful Rhone Glacier at Gletsch, is generally referred to as the district extending from Brigue (junction of the Simplon, Lotschberg and Furka Lines) to Lake Geneva. From a tourist point of view, with the exception of Sion and Sierre, it acts chiefly as the starting point for the numerous mountain resorts on the heights and in its lateral valleys. Commencing from the Lake.

AIGLE for Champery (via Montheyand Val d’I1liez) ; for Corbeyrier ; for Leystn (by funicular or car) ; for Le Sepey and Diablerets and via the Col des Mosses to Chateau-dOex ;

BEX-LES-BAINS for Villars (with Arveyes and Chesteres), Gryon, Les Plans;

MARTIGNY for Lac Champex, the Great St. Bernard, the Val Ferret (La Fouly), Col des Planches, Fionna y, the road to Chamonix via Forclaz and Trient, and the Martigny-Chamonix Electric Railway via Finhaut .

SION for Mayens de Sion, Evolena, La Sage, Les Hauderes , Arolla, Ferpecle and Bricolla ; SIERRE for Montana and Crans, Grimentz, St. Luc, the Weisshorn Hotel and the Val d’Anniviers generally;

TOURTEMAGNE for Gruben-Meiden .

VIRGE for the famous Summer and Winter mountain resort of Zermatt and the Zermatt Valley resorts (Randa, Taesch, etc.), and via Stalden for Saas-Fee and Saas-Grund ;

BRIGUE for the Furka Railway and Route, which includes Fiesch (starting point for the Eggfshorn mountain hotel and Binn) and Gletsch at the foot of the Rhone Glacier and the Grimsel Pass ; For the Loetschberg Railway to Berne, passing the stations of Goppenstein (for Fafleralp), Kandersteg, Fruttgen (for Adelboden), Spiez and Thoune ; For the Simplon Railway and car route to Domodossola (Italy) passing Berisal and the Hotel Bellevue at the summit of the Simplon Pass. Cars can be shipped through the Loetschberg and Simplon tunnels.

THE ST. GOTTHARD ROUTE (Bale-Milan Express) runs from the Lake of Lucerne southwards through beautiful mountain scenery to Lugano , Goeschenen (junction for Andermatt on the Furka-Oberalp Railway), Airolo and Bellinzona (for Locarno and Mesocco). The Car route over the Pass is open from Spring to Autumn. Cars are shipped through the tunnel at very moderate rates.

THE SWISS-ITALIAN LAKES include the Lake of Lugano and the Lago Maggiore, Locarno with Orselina and Ascona being the only resorts on the latter in Swiss territory. Lugano is a large tourist resort and the starting point of several beautiful excursions by mountain railways, steamer or car. Cademario and Sonvico lie on the heights above Lugano. Locarno, rendered famous through the Conference, is a mild climatic resort, the starting point for Lake excursions and the beautiful Centovalli Rail wa y to Domodossola and the Simplon, and for the Val Maggia Line to Bignasco. In early Spring the mimosa trees, camelias and other Southern vegetation add greatly to the charm of these Tessinese resorts.

Amongst WATERING PLACES, Ragaz , between Zurich and Coire, Tarasp-Schuls-Vulpera in the lower Engadine, Weissenburg on the M.O.B. line and Yverdon in the Jura are of the best known. The LEADING TOWNS are Basle, Berne, the Capital, Geneva, seat of the League of Nations, ‘Lausanne and Zurich. Each of these towns has an individual character and charm and is historically interesting. (For picturesque towns, see" For Sightseers ", Part I). The Railways of Switzerland are almost entirely run by electricity.

The "POSTES ALPESTRES" (public motorcar services) are most excellently organised and greatly facilitate travelling on the old diligence routes and in out of-the-way places.

The Principality of LIECHTENSTEIN, adjoining the Eastern Frontier of Switzerland, with its picturesquely situated Capital, VADUZ, is well worth visiting, either by train or car.

This post is the last of the “Holidays in The thirties” series so I’ll see if I cant find something else to build a new Monday series on. As I’m interested in just about anything I think you may see a new series next Monday –Ted

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Filed under: Article, Holidays, The thirties, Traveling Tagged: 1933, Switzerland

Sonja Jeannine – Retired Austrian Stage Actress

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Sonja Jeannine2Sonja Jeannine is a retired Austrian stage actress who particularly became famous with the sexploitation films of the early to mid-1970s.

Career

Jeannine started her career with the ensemble Löwinger-Bühne and later passed to cinema, especially acting in sex report films directed by Ernst Hofbauer, such as three Schulmädchen-Report films as well as Schlüsselloch-Report (hotel sexuality report) and Frühreifen-Report (adolescent sexuality report). During 1976 and 1977, she was active in Italian exploitation cinema but returned to Viennese theatres with Erich Padalewski by 1978. By the early 1980s, she was performing at Theater in der Josefstadt and during this period, she met entrepreneur Richard Lugner in 1983 with whom she got engaged. Jeannine’s last acting performance was in the play Der Schwierige at the Bregenz Festival the same year.

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Selected filmography

Sonja Jeannine3

Text from Wikipedia


Filed under: Actresses, Article, Models & starlets, Nudes, Pin-ups, The seventies Tagged: Austrian Actresses, Glamour photography, Sonja Jeannine

Coca-Cola Invents 16 Bottle Caps To Give Second Lives To Empty Bottles

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Coca Cola teamed up with award-winning ad agency Ogilvy & Mather China on a new “2nd Lives” campaign and created 16 red screw-on caps that transform the otherwise-useless left-over plastic bottle into something creative, fun and usable. This environmentally friendly campaign launched in Vietnam, where 40,000 free caps will be given away when purchasing the iconic soda drink.

These fun caps transform the used beverage bottles into a lamp, a paintbrush, a spray bottle, a pencil sharpener, a soap dispenser, and many other usable objects. Graham Fink, the chief creative officer of Ogilvy & Mather China, explains the idea behind the project: “We have created fun tools with Coke bottle tops, bringing small moments of happiness into people’s lives.

With the creativity of this campaign and the good cause behind it, this could easily be one of Coca Cola’s best campaigns ever. Don’t forget to check out the video to see how all the different caps are used.

Found on BoredPanda


Filed under: Camping, Soft drinks and sodas Tagged: Coca Cola, environmentally friendly campaigns, Second lives

Pre-War Classics Of The Road – Part 39

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1934 Hudson Convertible Coupé

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Virtually indistinguishable from its lower-priced running mate, the Terraplane, this Hudson Convertible Coupe dates from 1934. J Powered by a 31/2-litre, six-cylinder engine, it developed 80bhp. Hudson/ Terraplane sales for 1934 totalled 85,835, more than double the previous year’s total, but failed to prevent the Hudson Motor Car Company from recording a loss of $3.25 million.

 

1934 Lagonda Rapier

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A much nicer small sporting car of the early 1930s was the Lagonda Rapier, which had an 1100cc, four-cylinder engine with twin overhead camshafts. It appeared for the first time in 1934, costing only £270 in chassis form; after the Lagonda company was reformed in 1935, Rapiers were made by a separate firm at Hammersmith, and a supercharged version was announced in 1936. Total production, by the time the last Rapier was built in 1940, had amounted to some 300 cars.

 

1934 Riley Monaco

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The Riley Nine was, said enthusiastic owner Raymond Mays, ‘a really thoroughbred car in which the full meaning of the word "thoroughbred" plays a greater part than in any car I know’, However, by the mid 1930s, the saloon Rileys had put on extra weight at the expense of performance: this 1934 Monaco has steelpanelled coachwork instead of the fabric of the original Monaco, Although it was no longer faster than most of its contemporaries, the Monaco was still a strikingly handsome car.

 

1934 Steyr Type 100

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Austrian economy, the Type 100 Steyr, built between 1934 and 36, was a cheap 1.4-litre car with remarkable fuel consumption.


Filed under: Automobiles, Retro technology, Transportation Tagged: 1934 Hudson Convertible Coupé, 1934 Lagonda Rapier, 1934 Riley Monaco, 1934 Steyr Type 100

This Week’s Favourite Female Singer – Dolores Keane

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780_dolores keane_01Dolores Keane (born 26 September 1953) is an Irish folk singer and occasional actress. She was a founding member of the successful group De Dannan, and has since embarked on a very successful solo career, establishing herself as one of the most loved interpreters of Irish song.

Background

Keane was born in a small village called Sylane (near Tuam) in rural County Galway in the west of Ireland. She was raised by her aunts Rita and Sarah Keane since the age of four, who are also well-known sean-nós singers. Keane started her singing at a very young age, due to the influence of her musical aunts. She made her first recording for Radio Éireann in 1958, at the age of five. This early start inevitably meant that Keane would have a career in music. Her brother, Seán, also went on to enjoy a successful music career.

Musical career

De Dannan

In 1975, she co-founded the traditional Irish band De Dannan, and they released their debut album Dé Danann in that same year. The group gained international recognition and enjoyed major success in the late 1970s in the US. Keane went touring with the band and their single “The Rambling Irishman” was a big hit in Ireland. In early 1976, after a short two year spell, Keane left De Dannan and was replaced by Andy Irvine, who recorded live with the band on 30 April 1976, during the 3rd Irish Folk Festival in Germany. Soon thereafter, she married multi-instrumentalist John Faulkner, with whom she would subsequently record three albums of folk music (see next section).

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Solo career

The newly married Dolores and John decided to move to Britain. While there, the pair worked on a series of film scores and programmes for the BBC and formed two successful bands, The Reel Union and Kinvara. During this period Keane recorded her first solo album, There Was a Maid in 1978. This was followed by two other releases, Broken Hearted I’ll Wander (1979) and Farewell 780_dolores keane_04to Eirinn (1980), which gave credit to Faulkner. She returned to Ireland in the mid-1980s and rejoined withDe Dannan and recorded the albums Anthem and Ballroom with them.

Keane turned her attention, once again, to her solo career in 1988. It saw the release of the eponymous Dolores Keane album. Her follow-up album A Lion in a Cage, which hit the shelves in 1989, featured a song written by Faulkner called Lion in a Cage protesting the imprisonment of Nelson Mandela. It served as Keane’s second Irish number one and she performed the hit at the celebration of his release. This exposure expanded Keane’s reputation and popularity worldwide. A new facet was added to Dolores’ career when she played the female lead in the Dublin production of Brendan Behan‘s The Hostage, a new translation by Niall Tóibín and Michael Scott, the opening night of which was attended by Mary Robinson, the President of Ireland at the time.

In 1992, Keane was among the many female Irish singers to lend their music to the record-smashing anthology A Woman’s Heart. The album, which also featured Eleanor McEvoy, Mary Black, Frances Black, Sharon Shannon and Maura O’Connell, went on to become the biggest-selling album in Irish history. A Woman’s Heart Vol.2 was released in late 1994 and emulated its predecessor in album charts the world over. Also in 1994, a solo album, entitled Solid Ground, was released on the Shanachie label (available on Dara Records) and received critical acclaim in Europe and America.

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In August, 1995, Keane was awarded the prestigious Fiddler’s Green Hall of Fame award in Rostrevor, County Down, for her “significant contribution to the cause of Irish music and culture”. In that same year, she took to the stage in the Dublin production of JM Synge’s Playboy of the Western World. Dolores contributed to the RTÉ/BBC television production “Bringing It All Back Home”, a series of programmes illustrating the movement of Irish music to America. Dolores was shown performing both in Nashville, Tennessee with musicians such as Emmylou Harris and Richard Thompson and at home in Galway with her aunts Rita and Sarah.

In August, 1997, Keane went to number one again in the Irish album charts 780_dolores keane_05with a compilation album with her most loved songs. And another studio album was released by Keane in 1998, called Night Owl. It saw Keane returning to her traditional Irish roots and it did well in Europe and America. Despite a healthy solo career, Keane went on tour with De Dannan again in the late 1990s, where she played to packed audiences in venues such as Birmingham, Alabama and New York City.

Keane has not released a solo album since 1998 as of 2008, stating that she wanted to take a hard-earned break after twenty-five years of relentless touring.

Musical legacy

Keane is known the world-over for her deep, yet melodic voice. Her recordings of songs such as Dougie McLean‘s “Caledonia“, Frank A. Fahey’s “Galway Bay“, Paul Brady‘s “The Island” and “Never Be the Sun” are regarded as amongst the greatest interpretations of these songs. American singer Nanci Griffith said of Keane: “Dolores Keane, the queen of the soul of Ireland, has a sacred voice“.

Text from Wikipedia

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Filed under: Article, Folkrock, Music Tagged: De Dannan, Dolores Keane, Irish folksingers

The Lonely Hearts Killers

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763_lonely hearts_02"I’m no average killer!" Raymond Martinez Fernandez told Michigan cops on the day he was arrested. The slim, smartly dressed, balding man sat in the wooden chair between two detectives as he told a tawdry story of sex, lies and murder. He wiped his sweating forehead every few minutes with a white handkerchief supplied by his co-conspirator and obese sex slave, who looked on with wide-eyed admiration and love. For several hours he described their journey through a maze of deception and betrayal that ended with the deaths of as many as 17 women. "I have a way with women, a power over them," he said. That power, he claimed, was achieved by the practice of voodoo.

Raymond Martinez Fernandez, 34, was born in Hawaii of Spanish parents. His rotund girlfriend, Martha Jule Beck, 29, who weighed well over 200 pounds, lovingly brushed his thinning hair back on his head as he told police how they killed their last victims in the town of Byron Center, Michigan on the night of February 28, 1949. Later, when the victim’s two-year-old daughter refused to stop crying over the loss of her mother, Martha drowned her in a tub of dirty water while Raymond looked on. After the murders, they decided to go to the movies where they munched on popcorn and drank a gallon of soda.

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The day-by-day revelations about this bizarre couple had New York City’s press working overtime to keep up with the story that seemed too sleazy even by tabloid standards. Martha’s enormous size was the subject of never-ending speculation by the press who estimated her weight to be anywhere from 200 to over 300 pounds. This constant ridicule caused Martha to write a series of tearful, angry letters from prison to the media complaining of the unfair treatment she received from columnists like Walter Winchell and newspapers like The Daily News and the New York Mirror.

"I’m still a human, feeling every blow inside, even though I have the ability to hide my feelings and laugh," she said, "But that doesn’t say my heart isn’t breaking from the insults and humiliation of being talked about as I am. O yes, I wear a cloak of laughter."

Raymond Fernandez and Martha Beck

Fernandez and Beck came to be known as the "lonely hearts killers" in the nation’s press. Their murder trial took place during the scorching hot summer of 1949 in Bronx Criminal Court where the salacious testimony of "abnormal sexual practices" caused a near riot among spectators. The Latino Lothario and the plump, love-sick girlfriend who killed lonely, sex-starved women was a story weirder and more intriguing than anything out of the trashiest pulp magazines of the 1940s.

Read more here


Filed under: Article, People, The forties Tagged: Martha Jule Beck, Raymond Martinez Fernandez, The Lonely Hearts Killers

Excelsior Monarch MkII 1960-62

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After twelve months of development and ‘anything up to £20,000 costs’ the new Excelsior scooter was announced in June 1960 for production on the 1st July. The scooter was called the Monarch MKII and as the Scooter and Three Wheeler magazine stated ‘It’s all by Excelsior this time’ and ‘Glass Fibre for a new British Scooter’ The frame consisted of a 2¼” single tube backbone with three channel cross members supporting the floor.

The wheels were 10” diameter and quickly detachable – a well needed improvement over the rear wheel on the old Monarch. The engine was the same 147cc Excelsior unit with the Albion three speed gearbox operated by heel and toe pedals.

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The new scooter had a complete glass-fibre bodywork consisting of six sections, the rear body as one unit, two sections for the footboards, two mouldings formed the front apron with a separate moulding for the front mudguard.


Filed under: Facts, Motorcycles, The sixties Tagged: Excelsior Monarch MkII, Scooters

Grand-daddy’s Sauce – Part 41

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All posts material: “Sauce” and “Gentleman’s Relish” by Ronnie Barker – Hodder & Stoughton in 1977

The Difference

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The Lady: What is the difference between the burgundy at 5s. 6d.
and the one at 6s. 6d?
The waiter: One shilling, Madam.

Filed under: Humour, Illustration, Vintage Tagged: Burgundy, Waiters